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Real Time Analytics in Google Analytics

November 9, 2022 No Comments

What is Real Time Analytics

Real time Anaytics  in Google Analytics provides you a view of what is currently going on your site.  Current version of Google Analytics has 3 set of reports that it shows real time data for

  1. Location – Location of current visitors on your site
  2. Traffic Sources – It shows you the list of referral and keywords for the visitors currently on our sites
  3. Content – List of pages that the visitors are currently viewing

How To Get This Report

All the users of Google Analytics Latest version have this report enabled. So if you are using old version of Google Analytics, just switch to the new version and you will have this report.  It is under “Home” tab (see image below).

Uses of Real Time Analytics

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Few cases where you might want to (or be tempted to) use Real-Time Analytics

  • You launched a new campaign e.g. paid search, email newsletter, TV ad , and would like to see how people are reacting to those campaigns.
  • You added new promotions on your site and want to see how visitors are reacting to those promotions, so that you can tweak those promotions in real time.
  • You added new stories, links etc. and want to see if anybody is clicking on them so that you can make some changes based on instant feedback. I can see the usefulness of this feature for news and media sites.
  • You made some technical changes e.g. changed tracking code and want to see if those pages are being recorded in Google Analytics. Real time reports can serve as QA tools.
  • You launched a new feature on your site, launched a video, deployed a new game and would like to know if your visitors are using it or not.

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A Race to Bridge the Analog Divide in US Politics

November 8, 2022 No Comments

Nothing beats in-person efforts to boost a campaign. But rising platforms are helping connect politicians with the rest of us.
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Why Incorporating User-Generated Content on Social Media Will Increase Sales

November 8, 2022 No Comments

For a long time now, brands have requested that their fans submit their images, videos, thoughts, and narratives. User-generated content is an integral component of marketing strategies for several companies. A brand can get a lot of traction from well-run UGC efforts.

Wondering what is UGC? It refers to the content that you publish on your blog, website, or individual written social media platforms and that is outside of your business. 

Since UGC is typically earned, it generates highly sought traffic and interaction. If you are still feeling unsure about leveraging UGC in your social media marketing efforts, then read on to get more insights. 

Why Is User-Generated Content Required for Brands’ Social Media Marketing?

Let us provide some justifications for why you ought to incorporate User-Generated Content into your social media marketing plan.

UGC Provides Diverse Content

User-generated content is produced by various people with various backgrounds and experiences with your brand. In addition, they each have their own manner of expressing themselves.

You can give your audience something fresh and engaging each time you share content when you use UGC as your primary source of social media content. Your audience is intrigued by your variety of content, they interact with you, and they eagerly anticipate your marketing efforts, which increases your user engagement like never before.

Social Proof is Generated Through UGC

Social media has a significant social proof component. It’s merely one of the factors that promote user-generated content. Every time a new social media trend emerges, its users including ourselves produce content around it.

User-generated content serves that purpose exactly. It gives your audience members a sense of social proof. When a client sees user-generated content in your social media marketing campaigns, they are amazed by how you have provided your customers with a platform to share their opinions. They are inspired to produce content for you, providing you with more user-generated content to use.

Increased Transparency With User-Generated Content 

Users struggle to make decisions since there are so many brands growing on social media. However, adding user-generated content to your social media marketing plan gives your company a unique edge by adding transparency and authenticity.

A knowledgeable user who is not being paid for it produces user-generated content. And they’re doing it voluntarily and using social media to express themselves, which makes UGC raw. It increases trust with your prospects and enables them to make more assured purchase decisions.

How To Increase Sales By Including UGC on Social Media

Incorporate Social Media Widgets on Your Website 

Your limitations don’t have to be restricted to the confines of social media when it comes to social media marketing. They can be expanded upon and applied to additional consumer touchpoints, such as websites.

If social media is the stage in the marketing funnel that allows you to connect with your target market, then the section where you welcome them is the part of your website because that is where they go to find out more about your business.

Why not make a good first impression and provide them with something they’ll find interesting, believable, and relatable? While social media widgets let you include your chosen social media content on your website, you may use this tactic to attract user-generated content that was made by your clients to your website.

Your website’s performance and dwell time will also improve as a result of this technique, as users will stay on your site longer to interact with the user-generated content.

Showcase User-Generated Content on Your Social Media Accounts 

When you upload user-generated content to your social media business accounts, you can take advantage of the variety of content it provides to provide your social audience with some original content. 

It will motivate your audience to interact with and recommend your content to their friends and family.

By including user-generated content, you can encourage your audience to interact with your content. As more users interact with you on social media, it reaches a wider audience, enabling you to increase the reach of your company. In order to avoid spammy comments and trolls in the comments section, there is an option to turn off comments on Facebook, Instagram, and other social media platforms.

Publish Social Media Ads

Paid promotions are available on social media sites like Instagram and Facebook. The markets for these promotions are distinct. You can adjust your promotions to better suit your target audience by using various ages, genders, locations, and keyword filters. This will help you achieve the most return on investment.

The disadvantage is that because these campaigns are open to all business accounts on these social media sites, social media is overrun with social adverts that consumers frequently ignore or skip.

So, how will you be able to survive? User-generated content is the answer. User-generated content is what will hold users’ attention when they get tired of skipping over branded and other photoshopped content, compel them to engage, and motivate them to act positively on your social media ads.

Final Conclusion

In today’s social media marketing space, user-generated content improves how brands interact with their audience and foster a conversational flow between the brand and its consumers. Furthermore, it provides brands with social listening opportunities that enable them to better understand and serve their customers.

This brings us to the end of this post and you are now aware of the few ways in which you can strategically include User Generated Content in your social media marketing moves. Go on and improve your social media marketing with UGC right away!

The post Why Incorporating User-Generated Content on Social Media Will Increase Sales first appeared on PPC Hero.

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How to Add AddThis Analytics in Google Analytics?

November 7, 2022 No Comments

AddThis is social share widget that allows your visitors to easily share your content with others via email, social networks etc.

Add this has it’s own analytics that allows you to see what social share option e.g. Facebook, email, etc are visitors using. However, since you are already using Google Analytics, won’t it be nice if you can see your reports right within you Google Analytics reports.  That’s exactly what AddThis and Google Analytics integration does.

Add Google Analytics AddThis Integration

You don’t need anything fancy in Google Analytics.

  1. Create an account at AddThis
  2. Get your code
  3. Add following lines of code within your add this code
  4. <script type=”text/javascript”>
    var addthis_config = {
    data_ga_property: ‘UA-XXXXXXX-X’,
    data_ga_social : true
    };
    </script>

Here is full sample code:

<!– Google Analytics BEGIN –>
<script type=”text/javascript”>
var _gaq = _gaq || [];
_gaq.push([‘_setAccount’, ‘UA-xxxxxxx-x’]);
_gaq.push([‘_trackPageview’]);

(function() {
var ga = document.createElement(‘script’); ga.type = ‘text/javascript’; ga.async = true;
ga.src = (‘https:’ == document.location.protocol ? ‘https://ssl’ : ‘http://www’) + ‘.google-analytics.com/ga.js’;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
})();
</script>
<!– Google Analytics END –>

<!– AddThis Button BEGIN –>
<a href=”http://addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=250″>
<img src=”http://s7.addthis.com/static/btn/v2/lg-share-en.gif” width=”125″ height=”16″ alt=”Bookmark and Share” style=”border:0″/>
</a>

<script type=”text/javascript”>
var addthis_config = {
data_ga_property: ‘UA-xxxxxx-x’,
data_ga_social: true
};
</script>
<script type=”text/javascript” src=”http://s7.addthis.com/js/250/addthis_widget.js#pubid=gapremium”></script>

Here is what you will see in Google Analytics

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How to Get Slack’s Paid Features for Free

November 7, 2022 No Comments

If you can afford it, the app is worth it. But if you can’t, some workarounds will get you similar features without spending a dime.
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How to Exclude Internal Traffic from Google Analytics

November 6, 2022 No Comments

There are two ways to exclude internal traffic from Google Analytics

  1. Using IP address or range of IP addresses
  2. Using a custom variable and cookie when internal IP addresses are dynamic or not-known

To exclude traffic by IP address

There are two ways to do it

  1. Using a “Predefined” filter which has options to Exclude Traffic
  2. Using a Custom filter

1. Using a “Predefined” filter which has options to Exclude Traffic

Choose the options as shown below

  • Predefined Filter
  • Exclude
  • Traffic from the IP Addresses
  • That are equal to
  • Enter the value of IP address
  • Provide a name to filter and save it.

Note: In this case you need to enter the exact IP address else it won’t work.  Since you cannot enter any partial IP address, only “that are equal to option”

If you really want to use “ Begins with”, “Contains” , “End With” or IP address range then go over to “Custom Filter” or click on IPV6 option that allows you to enter regular expressions.

2. Using Custom Filter

In the filter opinion, choose “Custom Filter” instead of predefined.

On Custom Filter tab, choose following options

  • Exclude
  • Visitor IP address
  • Enter the IP you want to exclude or the range as specified by a Regular Expression
  • Name your Filter and save it

Note: Google has a tool to help you build a regular expression if needed

http://support.google.com/googleanalytics/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=55572

To Exclude Traffic by custom variable or cookie
How to Exclude Internal Traffic from Google Analytics when Internal IP Address is Dynamic

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TikTok Admits Staff in China Can Access Europeans’ Data

November 5, 2022 No Comments

Plus: Liz Truss’ phone-hacking trouble, Cash App’s sex-trafficking problem, and the rising cost of ransomware.
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Could these alternative SEO techniques be key to ranking successfully?

November 4, 2022 No Comments

With algorithm updates being rolled out on a more regular basis, staying at the top of Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs) has never been harder.

Gone are the days of signing up to directories, exact match domains, and keyword stuffing; SEO practitioners must do whatever they can to outrank their competitors.

Sure, you can put out more grind work through aggressive link-building outreach, hire a PR agency or a bunch of content writers, but could these simple alternative strategies below give you the edge?

Tip #1 – Post content when no one else is

The notion that ‘content is king’ is certainly true – you need good quality content and regular content uploaded to show you are proactive and not a dormant site.

Content cannot be thin, with thousands and thousands of words, because it needs to be relevant and answer questions in your industry, presented by # tags, useful links, images, and videos where possible.

“A competitive edge over your rivals is posting content when no one else is,” explains Rosie Marie, CEO of Rosca Technologies, a data optimisation solution.

“You have to understand that Google is an algorithm and a machine and not just a bunch of suits who look at websites one-by-one.”

Google recrawls every day or at least every few days, Marie explains, stressing it is hard to know precisely when this is. “If you can post content at alternative times of the day or year and Google decides to index your site, who knows, this could give you a competitive advantage,” she says.

Marie notes her business has tried posting content on weekends – easy to do if using a content management system – because others are unlikely to do so.

“In addition, we take advantage of things like UK bank holidays and that lazy week between Christmas and New Year’s because Google could very well pick up that we are being more proactive than our competitors. If this is the case, don’t we deserve to rank higher?”

Tip #2Get impartial users to critique your website

We regularly hear that time on site is a good SEO indicator, after all, if people hang on your site for a long time and click through to various pages, this shows that your information is useful, compared to a user who comes and leaves after 5 seconds, resulting in a low bounce rate.

“You could ask your partners and people in your industry to look through your site and offer their feedback,” says Gavin Cooper, founder of Claims Bible.

“Start by posting on LinkedIn and Facebook and say to your friends that you have just redesigned your site or have launched a new business and would truly welcome some feedback,” he says.

“Some of the feedback may not be nice to hear! But you will get a lot of dedicated users really looking through pages and scrolling through and this is great for SEO, certainly in the early days of a website launch.”

Cooper notes businesses must be careful to not forget that a higher click-through rate on Google’s search results also helps during the early buzz of a site launch.

“For instance, if you are ranked position 9 and more people click on you than position 3 or 4, this should also help your ranking,” he says.  “Similar ideas include sending out blast emails and SMS messages or making a big announcement on LinkedIn, but linking to your website. Don’t give LinkedIn the traffic, keep it for yourself!”

Tip #3 – Acquire links from simple sources

One of the most traditional link-building techniques is to create quality data-driven pieces and then email around and get links back to it as a resource e.g calculators, money that can be saved etc.

But not only is this very time-consuming but you have no guarantee over which links point back to you, and what anchor text is used.

“Our alternative technique involves finding websites that have already written articles or blog posts on your subject, whether you talk about health, finance, travel or anything that has expert opinion,” explains Luke Fitzpatrick, head of digital at Earned Media.

“Our approach involves reaching out to all those guides on page two to ten, contacting them and offering to give additional data to help ‘bulk up’ and refine their articles,” he says.

“Understandably, several publishers were thrilled to have more information in their articles and were pleased to give a follow link back as a reference. Link building achieved!”

Tip #4 – Using link bait that has already been successful

Content is king, but we know that links make the world go round. There are some things that work as excellent link bait for a brand, such as being nominated or winning awards, and being featured in press sections.

“But looking into competitors, there seem to be some lists that grab more attention than others,” says Richard Allan, co-founder of Capital Bean.

“Creating top lists such as best cities to do something, start a family or retire, tend to attract more interest than others, especially if they are filled with data.”

Allan also notes businesses should consider sponsoring large organisations in the health industry or non-profits since they often give a link and badge as part of it on their websites. “You get to help a great cause too,” he says.

“Another fascinating one is launching a scholarship or essay writing competition – which can attract links from universities and colleges if positioned well.”

 Tip #5 – Are you starting to fall? simple, refresh the content

Finally, if you ranked beautifully for some big keywords but find yourself starting to fall, you can just consider refreshing the content and replacing it with new and improved information, taking other points used by those who seem to be ranking better lately.

Google loves fresh content, and this helps your indexability, so it would not be strange to update your main landing pages every 6 months or so to give you that refresh.

The post Could these alternative SEO techniques be key to ranking successfully? appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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The Harms of Psychedelics Need to Be Put Into Context

November 4, 2022 No Comments

As psychedelic therapy trials get bigger and the drugs become more accessible, researchers need to start talking about their potential adverse effects.
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Is Google headed towards a continuous “real-time” algorithm?

November 3, 2022 No Comments

Is Google headed towards a continuous “real-time” algorithm

30-second summary:

  • The present reality is that Google presses the button and updates its algorithm, which in turn can update site rankings
  • What if we are entering a world where it is less of Google pressing a button and more of the algorithm automatically updating rankings in “real-time”?
  • Advisory Board member and Wix’s Head of SEO Branding, Mordy Oberstein shares his data observations and insights

If you’ve been doing SEO even for a short while, chances are you’re familiar with a Google algorithm update. Every so often, whether we like it or not, Google presses the button and updates its algorithm, which in turn can update our rankings. The key phrase here is “presses the button.” 

But, what if we are entering a world where it’s less of Google pressing a button and more of the algorithm automatically updating rankings in “real-time”? What would that world look like and who would it benefit? 

What do we mean by continuous real-time algorithm updates?

It is obvious that technology is constantly evolving but what needs to be made clear is that this applies to Google’s algorithm as well. As the technology available to Google improves, the search engine can do things like better understand the content and assess websites. However, this technology needs to be interjected into the algorithm. In other words, as new technology becomes available to Google or as the current technology improves (we might refer to this as machine learning “getting smarter”) Google, in order to utilize these advancements, needs to “make them a part” of its algorithms.

Take MUM for example. Google has started to use aspects of MUM in the algorithm. However, (at the time of writing) MUM is not fully implemented. As time goes on and based on Google’s previous announcements, MUM is almost certainly going to be applied to additional algorithmic tasks.  

Of course, once Google introduces new technology or has refined its current capabilities it will likely want to reassess rankings. If Google is better at understanding content or assessing site quality, wouldn’t it want to apply these capabilities to the rankings? When it does so, Google “presses the button” and releases an algorithm update. 

So, say one of Google’s current machine-learning properties has evolved. It’s taken the input over time and has been refined – it’s “smarter” for lack of a better word. Google may elect to “reintroduce” this refined machine learning property into the algorithm and reassess the pages being ranked accordingly.    

These updates are specific and purposeful. Google is “pushing the button.” This is most clearly seen when Google announces something like a core update or product review update or even a spam update. 

In fact, perhaps nothing better concretizes what I’ve been saying here than what Google said about its spam updates

“While Google’s automated systems to detect search spam are constantly operating, we occasionally make notable improvements to how they work…. From time to time, we improve that system to make it better at spotting spam and to help ensure it catches new types of spam.” 

In other words, Google was able to develop an improvement to a current machine learning property and released an update so that this improvement could be applied to ranking pages. 

If this process is “manual” (to use a crude word), what then would continuous “real-time” updates be? Let’s take Google’s Product Review Updates. Initially released in April of 2021, Google’s Product Review Updates aim at weeding out product review pages that are thin, unhelpful, and (if we’re going to call a spade a spade) exists essentially to earn affiliate revenue.

To do this, Google is using machine learning in a specific way, looking at specific criteria. With each iteration of the update (such as there was in December 2021, March 2022, etc.) these machine learning apparatuses have the opportunity to recalibrate and refine. Meaning, they can be potentially more effective over time as the machine “learns” – which is kind of the point when it comes to machine learning. 

What I theorize, at this point, is that as these machine learning properties refine themselves, rank fluctuates accordingly. Meaning, Google allows machine learning properties to “recalibrate” and impact the rankings. Google then reviews and analyzes and sees if the changes are to its liking. 

We may know this process as unconfirmed algorithm updates (for the record I am 100% not saying that all unconfirmed updates are as such). It’s why I believe there is such a strong tendency towards rank reversals in between official algorithm updates. 

It’s quite common that the SERP will see a noticeable increase in rank fluctuations that can impact a page’s rankings only to see those rankings reverse back to their original position with the next wave of rank fluctuations (whether that be a few days later or weeks later). In fact, this process can repeat itself multiple times. The net effect is a given page seeing rank changes followed by reversals or a series of reversals.  

across the board fluctuations - Google moving towards a “real-time” algorithm

A series of rank reversals impacting almost all pages ranking between position 5 and 20 that align with across-the-board heightened rank fluctuations 

This trend, as I see it, is Google allowing its machine learning properties to evolve or recalibrate (or however you’d like to describe it) in real-time. Meaning, no one is pushing a button over at Google but rather the algorithm is adjusting to the continuous “real-time” recalibration of the machine learning properties.

It’s this dynamic that I am referring to when I question if we are heading toward “real-time” or “continuous” algorithmic rank adjustments.

What would a continuous real-time google algorithm mean? 

So what? What if Google adopted a continuous real-time model? What would the practical implications be? 

In a nutshell, it would mean that rank volatility would be far more of a constant. Instead of waiting for Google to push the button on an algorithm update in order to rank to be significantly impacted as a construct, this would simply be the norm. The algorithm would be constantly evaluating pages/sites “on its own” and making adjustments to rank in more real-time. 

Another implication would be a lack of having to wait for the next update for restoration. While not a hard-fast rule, if you are significantly impacted by an official Google update, such as a core update, you generally won’t see rank restoration occur until the release of the next version of the update – whereupon your pages will be evaluated. In a real-time scenario, pages are constantly being evaluated, much the way links are with Penguin 4.0 which was released in 2016. To me, this would be a major change to the current “SERP ecosystem.” 

I would even argue that, to an extent, we already have a continuous “real-time” algorithm. In fact, that we at least partially have a real-time Google algorithm is simply fact. As mentioned, In 2016, Google released Penguin 4.0 which removed the need to wait for another version of the update as this specific algorithm evaluates pages on a constant basis. 

However, outside of Penguin, what do I mean when I say that, to an extent, we already have a continuous real-time algorithm? 

The case for real-time algorithm adjustments

The constant “real-time” rank adjustments that occur in the ecosystem are so significant that they refined the volatility landscape. 

Per Semrush data I pulled, there was a 58% increase in the number of days that reflected high-rank volatility in 2021 as compared to 2020. Similarly, there was a 59% increase in the number of days that reflected either high or very high levels of rank volatility: 

Data showing volatility - Google moving towards a “real-time” algorithm

Simply put, there is a significant increase in the number of instances that reflect elevated levels of rank volatility. After studying these trends and looking at the ranking patterns, I believe the aforementioned rank reversals are the cause. Meaning, a large portion of the increased instances in rank volatility are coming from what I believe to be machine learning continually recalibrating in “real-time,” thereby producing unprecedented levels of rank reversals. 

Supporting this is the fact (that along with the increased instances of rank volatility) we did not see increases in how drastic the rank movement is. Meaning, there are more instances of rank volatility but the degree of volatility did not increase. 

In fact, there was a decrease in how dramatic the average rank movement was in 2021 relative to 2020! 

Why? Again, I chalk this up to the recalibration of machine learning properties and their “real-time” impact on rankings. In other words, we’re starting to see more micro-movements that align with the natural evolution of Google’s machine-learning properties. 

When a machine learning property is refined as its intake/learning advances, you’re unlikely to see enormous swings in the rankings. Rather, you will see a refinement in the rankings that align with refinement in the machine learning itself. 

Hence, the rank movement we’re seeing, as a rule, is far more constant yet not as drastic. 

The final step towards continuous real-time algorithm updates

While much of the ranking movement that occurs is continuous in that it is not dependent on specific algorithmic refreshes, we’re not fully there yet. As I mentioned, much of the rank volatility is a series of reversing rank positions. Changes to these ranking patterns, again, are often not solidified until the rollout of an official Google update, most commonly, an official core algorithm update. 

Until the longer-lasting ranking patterns are set without the need to  “press the button” we don’t have a full-on continuous or “real-time” Google algorithm. 

However, I have to wonder if the trend is not heading toward that. For starters, Google’s Helpful Content Update (HCU) does function in real-time. 

Per Google

Our classifier for this update runs continuously, allowing it to monitor newly-launched sites and existing ones. As it determines that the unhelpful content has not returned in the long-term, the classification will no longer apply.”

How is this so? The same as what we’ve been saying all along here – Google has allowed its machine learning to have the autonomy it would need to be “real-time” or as Google calls it, “continuous”: 

This classifier process is entirely automated, using a machine-learning model.” 

For the record, continuous does not mean ever-changing. In the case of the HCU, there’s a logical validation period before restoration. Should we ever see a “truly” continuous real-time algorithm, this may apply in various ways as well. I don’t want to let on that the second you make a change to a page, there will be a ranking response should we ever see a “real-time” algorithm.

At the same time, the “traditional” officially “button-pushed” algorithm update has become less impactful over time. In a study I conducted back in late 2021, I noticed that Semrush data indicated that since 2018’s Medic Update, the core updates being released were becoming significantly less impactful.

the relation between Google's updates and rank volatility - Google moving towards a “real-time” algorithm

Data indicates that Google’s core updates are presenting less rank volatility overall as time goes on

Subsequently, this trend has continued. Per my analysis of the September 2022 Core Update, there was a noticeable drop-off in the volatility seen relative to the May 2022 Core Update

lesser rank volatility seen during Google's core update in Sep 2022 - Google moving towards a “real-time” algorithm

Rank volatility change was far less dramatic during the September 2022 Core Update relative to the May 2022 Core Update 

It’s a dual convergence. Google’s core update releases seem to be less impactful overall (obviously, individual sites can get slammed just as hard) while at the same time its latest update (the HCU) is continuous. 

To me, it all points towards Google looking to abandon the traditional algorithm update release model in favor of a more continuous construct. (Further evidence could be in how the release of official updates has changed. If you look back at the various outlets covering these updates, the data will show you that the roll-out now tends to be slower with fewer days of increased volatility and, again, with less overall impact). 

The question is, why would Google want to go to a more continuous real-time model? 

Why a continuous real-time google algorithm is beneficial

A real-time continuous algorithm? Why would Google want that? It’s pretty simple, I think. Having an update that continuously refreshes rankings to reward the appropriate pages and sites is a win for Google (again, I don’t mean instant content revision or optimization resulting in instant rank change).

Which is more beneficial to Google’s users? A continuous-like updating of the best results or periodic updates that can take months to present change? 

The idea of Google continuously analyzing and updating in a more real-time scenario is simply better for users. How does it help a user looking for the best result to have rankings that reset periodically with each new iteration of an official algorithm update? 

Wouldn’t it be better for users if a site, upon seeing its rankings slip, made changes that resulted in some great content, and instead of waiting months to have it rank well, users could access it on the SERP far sooner? 

Continuous algorithmic implementation means that Google can get better content in front of users far faster. 

It’s also better for websites. Do you really enjoy implementing a change in response to ranking loss and then having to wait perhaps months for restoration? 

Also, the fact that Google would so heavily rely on machine learning and trust the adjustments it was making only happens if Google is confident in its ability to understand content, relevancy, authority, etc. SEOs and site owners should want this. It means that Google could rely less on secondary signals and more directly on the primary commodity, content and its relevance, trustworthiness, etc. 

Google being able to more directly assess content, pages, and domains overall is healthy for the web. It also opens the door for niche sites and sites that are not massive super-authorities (think the Amazons and WebMDs of the world). 

Google’s better understanding of content creates more parity. Google moving towards a more real-time model would be a manifestation of that better understanding.

A new way of thinking about google updates

A continuous real-time algorithm would intrinsically change the way we would have to think about Google updates. It would, to a greater or lesser extent, make tracking updates as we now know them essentially obsolete. It would change the way we look at SEO weather tools in that, instead of looking for specific moments of increased rank volatility, we’d pay more attention to overall trends over an extended period of time. 

Based on the ranking trends we already discussed, I’d argue that, to a certain extent, that time has already come. We’re already living in an environment where rankings fluctuate far more than they used to and to an extent has redefined what stable rankings mean in many situations. 

To both conclude and put things simply, edging closer to a continuous real-time algorithm is part and parcel of a new era in ranking organically on Google’s SERP.


Mordy Oberstein is Head of SEO Branding at Wix. Mordy can be found on Twitter @MordyOberstein.

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The post Is Google headed towards a continuous “real-time” algorithm? appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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