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In a sea of signals, is your on-page on-point?

November 2, 2022 No Comments

In a sea of signals, is your on-page on-point

30-second summary:

  • Content managers who want to assess their on-page performance can feel lost at sea due to numerous SEO signals and their perceptions
  • This problem gets bigger and highly complex for industries with niche semantics
  • The scenarios they present to the content planning process are highly specific, with unique lexicons and semantic relationships
  • Sr. SEO Strategist at Brainlabs, Zach Wales, uses findings from a rigorous competitive analysis to shed light on how to evaluate your on-page game

Industries with niche terminology, like scientific or medical ecommerce brands, present a layer of complexity to SEO. The scenarios they present to the content planning process are highly specific, with unique lexicons and semantic relationships. 

SEO has many layers to begin with, from technical to content. They all aim to optimize for numerous search engine ranking signals, some of which are moving targets. 

So how does one approach on-page SEO in this challenging space? We recently had the privilege of conducting a lengthy competitive analysis for a client in one of these industries. 

What we walked away with was a repeatable process for on-page analysis in a complicated semantic space. 

The challenge: Turning findings into action

At the outset of any analysis, it’s important to define the challenge. In the most general sense, ours was to turn findings into meaningful on-page actions — with priorities. 

And we would do this by comparing the keyword ranking performance of our client’s domain to that of its five chosen competitors.

Specifically, we needed to identify areas of the client’s website content that were losing to competitors in keyword rankings. And to prioritize things, we needed to show where those losses were having the greatest impact on our client’s potential for search traffic.

Adding to the complexity were two additional sub-challenges:

  1. Volume of keyword data. When people think of “niche markets,” the implication is usually a small number of keywords with low monthly search volumes (MSV). Scientific industries are not so. They are “niche” in the sense that their semantics are not accessible to all—including keyword research tools—but their depth & breadth of keyword potential is vast.
  2. Our client already dominated the market. At first glance, using keyword gap analysis tools, there were no product categories where our client wasn’t dominating the market. Yet they were incurring traffic losses from these five competitors from a seemingly random, spread-out number of cases. Taken together incrementally, these losses had significant impacts on their web traffic. 

If the needle-in-a-haystack analogy comes to mind, you see where this is going. 

To put the details to our challenge, we had to:

  • Identify where those incremental effects of keyword rank loss were being felt the most — knowing this would guide our prioritization;
  • Map those keyword trends to their respective stage of the marketing funnel (from informational top-of-funnel to the transactional bottom-of-funnel) 
  • Rule out off-page factors like backlink equity, Core Web Vitals & page speed metrics, in order to…
  • Isolate cases where competitor pages ranked higher than our client’s on the merits of their on-page techniques, and finally
  • Identify what those successful on-page techniques were, in hopes that our client could adapt its content to a winning on-page formula.   

How to spot trends in a sea of data

When the data sets you’re working with are large and no apparent trends stand out, it’s not because they don’t exist. It only means you have to adjust the way you look at the data.

As a disclaimer, we’re not purporting that our approach is the only approach. It was one that made sense in response to another challenge at hand, which, again, is one that’s common to this industry: The intent measures of SEO tools like Semrush and Ahrefs — “Informational,” “Navigational,” “Commercial” and “Transactional,” or some combination thereof — are not very reliable. 

Our approach to spotting these trends in a sea of data went like this:

Step 1. Break it down to short-tail vs. long tail

Numbers don’t lie. Absent reliable intent data, we cut the dataset in half based on MSV ranges: Keywords with MSVs above 200 and those equal to/below 200. We even graphed these out, and indeed, it returned a classic short/long-tail curve.

on-page SEO signals - Short tail vs long tail keyword performance 

This gave us a proxy for funnel mapping: Short-tail keywords, defined as high-MSV & broad focus, could be mostly associated with the upper funnel. This made long-tail keywords, being less searched but more specifically focused, a proxy for the lower funnel. 

Doing this also helped us manage the million-plus keyword dataset our tools generated for the client and its five competitor websites. Even if you perform the export hack of downloading data in batches, neither Google Drive nor your device’s RAM want anything to do with that much data.

Step 2. Establish a list of keyword-operative root words

The “keyword-operative root word” is the term we gave to root words that are common to many or all of the keywords under a certain topic or content type. For example, “dna” is a common root word to most of the keywords about DNA lab products, which our client and its competitors sell. And “protocols” is a root word for many keywords that exist in upper-funnel, informational content.

We established this list by placing our short- and long-tail data (exported from Semrush’s Keyword Gap analysis tool) into two spreadsheets, where we were able to view the shared keyword rankings of our client and the five competitors. We equipped these spreadsheets with data filters and formulas that scored each keyword with a competitive value, relative to the six web domains analyzed.  

Separately, we took a list of our client’s product categories and brainstormed all possibilities for keyword-operative root words. Finally, we filtered the data for each root word and noted trends, such as the number of keywords that a website ranked for on Google page 1, and the sum of their MSVs. 

Finally, we applied a calculation that incorporated average position, MSV, and industry click-through rates to quantify the significance of a trend. So if a competitor appeared to have a keyword ranking edge over our client in a certain subset of keywords, we could place a numerical value on that edge. 

Step 3. Identify content templates

If one of your objectives is to map keyword trends to the marketing funnel, then it’s critical to understand the role of page templates. Why? 

Page speed performance is a known ranking signal that should be considered. And ecommerce websites often have content templates that reflect each stage of the funnel. 

In this case, all six competitors conveniently had distinct templates for top-, middle- and bottom-funnel content:

  • Top-funnel templates: Text-heavy, informational content in what was commonly called “Learning Resources” or something similar;
  • Middle-funnel templates: Also text-heavy, informational content about a product category, with links to products and visual content like diagrams and videos — the Product Landing Page (PLP), essentially;
  • Bottom-funnel templates: Transactional, Product Detail Pages (PDP) with concise, conversion-oriented text and purchasing calls-to-action.

Step 4. Map keyword trends to the funnel

After cross-examining the root terms (Step 2), keyword ranking trends began to emerge. Now we just had to map them to their respective funnel stage.

Having identified content templates, and having the data divided by short- & long-tail made this a quicker process. Our primary focus was on trends where competitor webpages were outranking our client’s site. 

on-page SEO signals - Page Speed Insight Scores on-page SEO signals - Page Speed Insight Scores by device and competitor comparison

Identifying content templates brought the added value of seeing where competitors, for example, outranked our client on a certain keyword because their winning webpage was built in a content-rich, optimized PLP, while our client’s lower-ranking page was a PDP.

Step 5. Rule out the off-page ranking factors

Since our goal was to identify & analyze on-page techniques, we had to rule out off-page factors like link equity and page speed. We sought cases where one page outranked another on a shared keyword, in spite of having inferior link equity, page speed scores, etc. 

For all of Google’s developments in processing semantics (e.g., BERT, the Helpful Content Update) there are still cases where a page with thin text content outranks another page that has lengthier, optimized text content — by virtue of link equity. 

To rule these factors out, we assigned an “SEO scorecard” to each webpage under investigation. The scorecard tallied the number of rank-signal-worthy attributes the page had in its SEO favor. This included things like Semrush’s page authority score, the number of internal vs. external inlinks, the presence and types of Schema markup, and Core Web Vitals stats.

on-page SEO signals - SEO Scorecard

The scorecards also included on-page factors, like the number of headers & subheaders (H1, H2, H3…), use of keywords in alt-tags, meta titles & their character counts, and even page word count. This helped give a high-level sense of on-page performance before diving into the content itself. 

Our findings

When comparing the SEO scorecards of our client’s pages to its competitors, we only chose cases where the losing scorecard (in off-page factors) was the keyword ranking winner. Here are a few of the standout findings.

Adding H3 tags to products names really works

This month, OrangeValley’s Koen Leemans published a Semrush article, titled, SEO Split Test Result: Adding H3 Tags to Products Names on Ecommerce Category Pages. We found this study especially well-timed, as it validated what we saw in this competitive analysis.

To those versed in on-page SEO, placing keywords in <h3> HTML format (or any level of <h…> for that matter) is a wise move. Google crawls this text before it gets to the paragraph copy. It’s a known ranking signal. 

When it comes to SEO-informed content planning, ecommerce clients have a tendency — coming from the best of intentions — to forsake the product name in pursuit of the perfect on-page recipe for a specific non-brand keyword. The value of the product name becomes a blind spot because the brand assumes it will outrank others on its own product names.

It’s somewhere in this thought process that an editor may, for example, decide to list product names on a PLP as bolded <p> copy, rather than as a <h3> or <h4>. This, apparently, is a missed opportunity. 

More to this point, we found that this on-page tactic performed even better when the <h>-tagged product name was linked (index, follow) to its corresponding PDP, AND accompanied with a sentence description beneath the product name. 

This is in contrast to the product landing page (PLP) which has ample supporting page copy, and only lists its products as hyperlinked names with no descriptive text. 

Word count probably matters, <h> count very likely matters

In the ecommerce space, it’s not uncommon to find PLPs that have not been visited by the content fairy. A storyless grid of images and product names. 

Yet, in every case where two PLPs of this variety went toe-to-toe over the same keyword, the sheer number of <h> tags seemed to be the only on-page factor that ranked one PLP above its competitors’ PLPs, which themselves had higher link equity. 

The takeaway here is that if you know you won’t have time to touch up your PLPs with landing copy, you should at least set all product names to <h> tags that are hyperlinked, and increase the number of them (e.g., set the page to load 6 rows of products instead of 4).  

And word count? Although Google’s John Mueller confirmed that word count is not a ranking factor for the search algorithm, this topic is debated. We cannot venture anything conclusive about word count from our competitive analyses. What we can say is that it’s a component of our finding that…

Defining the entire topic with your content wins

Backlinko’s Brian Dean ventured and proved the radical notion that you can optimize a single webpage to rank for not the usual 2 or 3 target keywords, but hundreds of them. That is if your copy encompasses everything about the topic that unites those hundreds of keywords. 

That practice may work in long-form content marketing but is a little less applicable in ecommerce settings. The alternative to this is to create a body of pages that are all interlinked deliberately and logically (from a UX standpoint) and that cover every aspect of the topic at hand.

This content should address the questions that people have at each stage of the awareness-to-purchase cycle (i.e., the funnel). It should define niche terminology and spell out acronyms. It should be accessible.

In one stand-out case from our analysis, a competitor page held position 1 for a lucrative keyword, while our client’s site and that of the other competitors couldn’t even muster a page 1 ranking. All six websites were addressing the keyword head-on, arguably, in all the right ways. And they had superior link equity.

What did the winner have that the rest did not? It happened that in this lone instance, its product was being marketed to a high-school teacher/administrator audience, rather than a PhD-level, corporate, governmental or university scientist. By this virtue alone, their marketing copy was far more layman-accessible, and, apparently, Google approved too.

The takeaway is not to dumb-down the necessary jargon of a technical industry. But it highlights the need to tell every part of the story within a topic vertical. 

Conclusion: Findings-to-action

There is a common emphasis among SEO bloggers who specialize in biotech & scientific industries on taking a top-down, topical takeover approach to content planning. 

I came across these posts after completing this competitive analysis for our client. This topic-takeover emphasis was validating because the “Findings-To-Action” section of our study prescribed something similar:

Map topics to the funnel. Prior to keyword research, map broad topics & subtopics to their respective places in the informational & consumer funnel. Within each topic vertical, identify:

  • Questions-to-ask & problems-to-solve at each funnel stage
  • Keyword opportunities that roll up to those respective stages
  • How many pages should be planned to rank for those keywords
  • The website templates that best accommodate this content
  • The header & internal linking strategy between those pages

Unlike more common-language industries, the need to appeal to two audiences is especially pronounced in scientific industries. One is the AI-driven audience of search engine bots that scour this complex semantic terrain for symmetry of clues and meaning. The other is human, of course, but with a mind that has already mastered this symmetry and is highly capable of discerning it. 

To make the most efficient use of time and user experience, content planning and delivery need to be highly organized. The age-old marketing funnel concept works especially well as an organizing model. The rest is the rigor of applying this full-topic-coverage, content approach.


Zach Wales is Sr. SEO Strategist at Brainlabs.

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The post In a sea of signals, is your on-page on-point? appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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What Is Predictive Analysis and Its Role in a Winning Marketing Strategy

November 2, 2022 No Comments

Predictive analysis is often applied to manage supply chains and business operations and to analyze consumer behavior. According to Statista.com, predictive analysis is here to stay with a value of $ 5.29 billion in 2020, and is forecast to grow to $ 41.52 billion by 2028.   

But what is it? How can it positively impact your business and marketing strategies? Let’s find out.    

What is Predictive Analysis?

Predictive analysis is a form of business analysis that uses statistics or machine learning to predict the outcome of something. That something can be anything from consumer intent and customer lifetime value to sales trends. 

Compared to other types of business analysis, while predictive analysis focuses on what is likely to happen, descriptive analysis looks at what has happened. Prescriptive analysis seeks answers based on the other two analytics to determine what should happen – according to what has happened and what is likely to happen. 

Predictive analysis can be used to:

  • Forecast future customer churn rates. 
  • Accurately predict future sales forecasts.
  • Enable businesses to order the optimal amount of inventory to meet customer demand.
  • Calculate a customer’s lifetime value (CLV).
  • Predict what products a customer is likely to buy in the future. 
  • Prevent logistics or warehouse equipment malfunctions. 

What Are Methods of Predictive Analysis?

Harnessing current and/or historical data with statistical techniques like predictive modeling, deep learning algorithms, machine learning, and data mining, predictive analysis can forecast future likely events.  

Other types of predictive analysis techniques include:

  • Data clustering uses machine learning to group objects into categories based on similarities, such as audience segmentation based on past engagement.  
  • Classification is a prediction technique that involves calculating the probability that an item belongs to a particular category.
  • Logistic regression finds correlations between inputs and outputs.
  • Decision trees are supervised learning algorithms used to determine courses of action and the probabilities associated with each, depending on sets of variables. 
  • Time series analysis is a technique used for analyzing time-series data, such as changes over periods. 

What is a Predictive Analysis Example?

A good use case for predictive analysis is in the eCommerce space – specifically product recommendations. Smart algorithms create accurate projections for consumers based on what they’ve previously bought and other contextual reasons. 

One example of these algorithms in practice involves looking at the purchase and reviewing the history of the consumer and recommending products on similar user data. Any products that the user has previously purchased would be disregarded.  

Brands seeking to improve customer engagement and conversion rates often garner great results from recommendation engines. Done right, this predictive analysis marketing strategy encourages upsells and cross-sells, establishes brand loyalty, and ensures the customers return for more.

The Role of Predictive Analysis in Marketing 

Personalized Experiences 

Predictive analysis forms the backbone of winning marketing strategies. This is because using data in the right way enables personalized customer experiences and drives sales. In marketing, needs forecasting is a widely used predictive analytics tool, where businesses anticipate customer needs based on their web browsing habits. 

For instance, online home renovation retailers can predict when a customer is in the market for decorating products due to increased searches for home improvements. 

Solving Problems

Predictive analysis solves customer problems before they are aware that they have problems. Using customer intent and behavior data, businesses can see which customers are more at risk of churn and act accordingly, even if they have a PandaDoc convertible note agreement template in place. Proactively addressing potential issues is a good business position to be in and minimizes the impact on the overall customer experience. 

New Customer Acquisition 

Use data segmentation as predictive analysis to define customer identification models. This practice works by identifying potential customers based on your existing customers’ needs, wants, purchase behavior, and preferences.  

Optimize Marketing Budget 

Predictive analysis enables marketers to spend budgets more effectively – whether the goal is to convert potential customers, attract a new audience segment, or retain existing customers. Because predictive analysis can help you understand the actions of users that indicate their conversion intentions, you can craft relevant landing pages, sales funnels, and marketing campaigns that are poised to positively impact your bottom line.

The Predictive Analysis Marketing Process

How could predictive analysis look in your business? 

  1. Define what question you want to answer – e.g. which prospects are likely to sign up for my service within the next 30 days? 
  2. Gather the data – our example needs historical prospects data (specifically how much time it took past prospects to convert), demographic and channel data, plus a current list of prospects. 
  3. Undertake descriptive analysis to determine facts, such as whether the average conversion time varies between channels and whether demographics correlate with these time frames.  
  4. Use statistical techniques to test your theories. 
  5. Create a predictive model after your test discoveries to predict outcomes. 
  6. Deploy the predictive model to glean actionable insights, e.g., the prospects that will likely sign up within the next 30 days.
  7. Create targeted marketing strategies with these prospects in mind in the hope of maximum conversions. 
  8. Update the predictive model regularly to meet new requirements. 

Remember that external influences can skew your data – think about seasonal changes, news events, global crises, etc. 

How to Maximize Success in Marketing with Predictive Analysis

Some critical tips to use predictive analysis to its best effect include:

  • Gather as much of the right data as possible. 
  • Decide on the most relevant modeling techniques and algorithms for the specific project. 
  • Have processes to reduce potential biases. 

We Predict That Predictive Analysis is the Future of Marketing

Predictive analysis is fast becoming a vital decision-making tool for forward-thinking businesses. Regardless of industry, predictive analysis can give you the insights you need to drive your marketing. By enabling intelligent data for science collection and harnessing it to accurately predict future outcomes, organizations use predictive analysis to make extremely profitable decisions.

The post What Is Predictive Analysis and Its Role in a Winning Marketing Strategy first appeared on PPC Hero.

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Seeking Psychedelics? Check the Data Privacy Clause

November 2, 2022 No Comments

Colorado’s Proposition 122 wants to let people take psilocybin at healing centers. But sensitive data isn’t covered by medical privacy protections.
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Introducing two new solutions powered by Ads Data Hub

November 1, 2022 No Comments

Ads Data Hub helps advertisers, agencies and measurement partners do customized analysis of campaigns while protecting user privacy. More than 3,000 brands, agencies, and measurement partners use cloud-based Ads Data Hub to perform analyses for their specific business objectives.

Customers of Ads Data Hub have different needs, so we’ve created more specialized entry points to get started. Marketers require tools to quantify a consumer’s path to purchase and the ability to activate new audiences. At the same time, measurement partners conduct third-party assessment of metrics such as video viewability and audience reach.

To offer a more tailored experience, we are introducing an evolution to the Ads Data Hub core platform by introducing two dedicated solutions: Ads Data Hub for Marketers and Ads Data Hub for Measurement Partners.

New solutions for more catered needs

Ads Data Hub for Marketers offers a new way for advertisers and agencies to analyze their data. With this solution, they can seamlessly access insights to better inform the way they purchase media. This means a simplified experience for marketers running queries and activating their first-party data.

Riot Games, for example, used Ads Data Hub for richer marketing analyses. The company centralized their insights and combined them with Display & Video 360 and Campaign Manager 360 data. This let Riot Games attribute credit to various ad touch points, accurately measure return on ad spend (ROAS), and establish a new benchmark showing that for every $ 1 Riot Games spent on Google media, it received $ 2 in revenue. Marketers, like Riot Games, perform these analyses regularly, with hundreds of thousands of queries run in 2022 alone.

Over time, new query templates, automated workflows, and updates to reporting will reduce the need for additional technical resources and decrease time to generate insights – with plans to implement Publisher Advertiser Identity Reconciliation, also known as PAIR. In addition to these improvements, marketers will soon be able to activate their audience segments on new inventory, including YouTube. As privacy expectations evolve, we will continue to build more solutions that enable advertisers and agencies to measure and activate their first-party data with Ads Data Hub for Marketers.

Ads Data Hub for Measurement Partners gives partners a new access point to provide YouTube measurement services on behalf of marketers, advertisers, agencies, or publishers. With this launch, it’ll be easier for partners to offer accurate measurement and deliver near real-time insights. For marketers, this means they can work with independent third-party partners to calculate and report on YouTube ad performance across devices, formats, and metrics.

These third-party independent measurement services are available to marketers via our growing partner ecosystem. With Dynata, and other vendors, we have expanded measurement services on Ads Data Hub to enable cross-media solutions for YouTube. Customers will be able to analyze the performance of YouTube campaigns relative to other media channels (including linear TV, streaming TV, or online video sources). Another partner, DoubleVerify, has earned YouTube Video Viewability accreditation by the Media Rating Council (MRC), in addition to Ads Data Hub’s own accreditation announced last year.

In 2023 we plan to integrate with new partners such as iSpot and VideoAmp, joining the list of measurement partners already available with Ads Data Hub.

Commitment to a privacy-centric future

Marketers and measurement partners will benefit from rigorous privacy checks that protect the personal data of users online while still being able to perform comprehensive analytics. These analyses, in addition to insight generation and audience activation, can all be performed with Ads Data Hub users only having access to aggregated data. By investing in privacy-centric solutions that address the specific needs of marketers and measurement partners, we’ve simplified the path to accurate measurement across YouTube and Google campaigns.


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How the Creator Economy Is Changing Marketing

November 1, 2022 No Comments

In the modern online world, everyone with an internet connection can be a creator. With so many social platforms, forums, and online hubs, (as well as millions of websites where creators can promote themselves, their business, products, or simply their work), it should come as no surprise that the creator economy is booming all over the world.

But what does this mean for businesses and is there an opportunity here for business leaders to leverage the creator economy to achieve their marketing, sales, and branding goals? The answer is a resounding yes. However, it can often be difficult to identify the strategies and tactics you should employ to make the most of the creator economy for your business.

So, today we are taking a look at the best practices you can start using right now to make the creator economy work for you and help you take your brand forward in 2023 and the years to come.

Identifying the Ideal Creators in Your Space

There’s a whole world of new, experienced, and veteran content creators out there, as well as those who are entering the playing field every minute. Without a doubt, there are many creators in many different online spaces that you can reach out to or people you can influence to start creating content about your brand, products, or services.

But where do you begin and how do you make sure that the people you engage or the influencers you start working with are the right fit for your brand’s identity, values, and vision? First things first, you need to research your audience and potential creators thoroughly.

Researching your audience is essential for all marketing activities and when you’re working with programmatic advertising companies to automate various advertising activities, but it’s also important when you’re engaging content creators for word-of-mouth campaigns, shout-outs, and more. With that in mind, you should make sure to:

  • Identify your target audience and build detailed avatars
  • Identify the platforms they use
  • Identify the top influencers in that space
  • Continue researching micro-influencers and creators
  • Compare their personal brands with your own brand
  • Ensure brand compatibility along with values, drivers, and messaging

Building More Authentic Partnerships

Nowadays, everyone can be an influencer, and while that opens many new opportunities for businesses and individuals, it also comes with certain challenges and potential drawbacks. Namely, with so many influencers and content creators out there, it can be difficult to build a lasting relationship with your audience and inspire them to stick around for the long haul.

New and equally entertaining content creators are popping up at every corner, and people are discovering fresh, exciting content every day. This is why it’s important that the people you work with not only have a loyal following but that they’re staying on top of the latest social media trends in their field in order to keep their audience engaged.

In order to build more authentic, long-lasting partnerships with your content creators, you also need to ensure the perfect brand fit. This is how their audience will become your brand’s audience and eventually your loyal customers because after all, if the creator shares your brand’s values and key traits, then everything they put out will be more honest and authentic – and people will respect them for it.

Types of Content for Your Creators

In digital marketing, there are many types of content that businesses can use to spark engagement and stay relevant in the fast-paced online world. While content marketing is often associated with written content only, the reality is that written content is just one piece of the content puzzle.

In fact, the more you diversify your content, the better you’ll be at engaging audiences across digital platforms. For example, a blogger influencer can create an informative article on their website promoting your brand, but that won’t do you much good for your social media video strategy for those platforms that are strictly visual in nature. That’s why content diversification is important so that you can cover all the platforms and their preferred content types.

When choosing your creators, you should be mindful of the platforms they use and the types of content they create. Make sure to diversify between:

  • Reel creators
  • Visual artists for unique imagery and infographics
  • Podcast creators
  • Bloggers
  • Vloggers

Leveraging Employees as Creators

While other businesses are competing with who can partner up with the most external influencers, you might want to look internally for your creator superstars. Not many businesses think to leverage their employees for content creation, and when they do, they often do it in such a way that it makes it seem forced rather than organic.

If you’re going to tap into the potential of your employee collective, you can’t demand that they create content, you need to inspire and incentivize it. This comes from:

  • Being an excellent employer and having an engaging employer brand
  • Acknowledging and appreciating your employees
  • Having a positive workplace culture
  • Investing in employee advancement and training
  • Providing excellent working conditions and perks

When you have this basis, you can confidently ask your employees to share and create content to promote your business. They write engaging posts talking about your brand or a specific solution and complement them with various visuals from Depositphotos.com and similar royalty-free repositories where they can find fresh visuals for every new post. 

Combining visuals with written content will be the best way to create engaging posts for their social media pages, but also for forums and online groups, and professional platforms like Glassdoor and LinkedIn.

Utilizing Social Media for Brand Reach and Sales

The majority of content creators can be found on social media networks, and more importantly, social media is where the majority of your audience will spend their time online. While online forums, groups, and even blogging sites should be a part of your strategy, social media content creation should be your primary concern if you want to increase sales and brand reach.

When creating social media content, you can also download the content to be used for other marketing purposes and channels, as well. For example, if your employees are creating reels, they can then download Instagram reels with audio to repurpose parts of the content (audio or video only, or both) for other platforms, the company’s content page, or even your landing pages.

The possibilities are numerous, and you need to optimize the content you and your creators are posting for every specific platform. 

Keep in mind that while TikTok strictly thrives on short video content that’s dynamic and fast-paced, Instagram is also good for reels that are very educational and have a slightly slower pace. On LinkedIn, on the other hand, you and your creators have a chance to create long-form educational content and bring a lot of value to your audience. 

With all of that in mind, always remember to optimize the content for the unique preferences of every social platform.

Taking Action and Landing on Your Website

Most of the effort you put into your content and your creators will be to incentivize potential customers to head over to your website and buy something with a unique code, or to take advantage of a limited-time offer. In fact, the possibilities here are endless, as you can also inspire them to come over and participate in a quiz, download some free materials, or grab a personalized bundle offer on signup.

What all of these incentives have in common is that they are located on your landing pages, meaning the pages people land on after following a link your influencers published or clicking on a CTA in their posts or video description. Needless to say, this can be a powerful way to promote a product launch as well.

Your landing page strategies need to include everything from testimonials and product tours, to social proof and special incentives in order to generate the desired results. They also need to complement the content created by your influencers in order to ensure messaging continuity from social media over to your landing page.

Once you have optimized your landing pages, then all the content that your creators publish will have a much higher chance of generating tangible results. 

Over to You

The creator economy is booming around the world and now’s the time for business leaders to take action and implement the best practices that will help them leverage these creators to boost their marketing, sales, and branding across the board. With these tips and tactics in mind, go ahead and include the creator economy into your 2023 strategy, and invest in this lucrative opportunity to take your business forward in the competitive online world.

The post How the Creator Economy Is Changing Marketing first appeared on PPC Hero.

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SEO doesn’t have to be scary: shift from a reactive to proactive strategy

November 1, 2022 No Comments

SEO doesn't have to be scary shift from a reactive to proactive strategy

30-second summary:

  • SEO is a reality that all marketers face and many try to steer clear of as they devise an all-encompassing digital marketing strategy that is reactive in nature
  • Begin by familiarizing yourself with Google’s Page Quality Rating Guidelines
  • Create a sound SEO strategy to use every time you start the content creation process, include – researching audience needs, keyword considerations, and internal linking
  • Make sure to clean up and update your existing content so that it doesn’t drag down new, SEO-optimized content

SEO can be vague. It is nuanced. It is always in a state of evolution. But that doesn’t change the fact that it is a very real factor that impacts your marketing, whether you plan for it or not. 

Many marketers discover the powerful effects of SEO when it’s too late. Their content is already underperforming. It isn’t ranking for the right keywords. It isn’t retaining readers and has a low dwell time. 

Fixing the issue of bad SEO wastes time and resources. It’s also completely unavoidable.

The key to utilizing SEO to your advantage is to approach it in a proactive rather than a reactive manner. If you’re in a pattern of noticing the effects of SEO on your online content and trying to make adjustments after the fact, here are some suggestions to help you seize the reins and regain a sense of control over your organic search traffic.

1. Associate yourself with Google’s Page Quality Rating Guidelines

If you want to dominate with your SEO, you need to start by understanding it as much as possible. This is much easier said than done. SEO often feels more like an art form than a science. Algorithms can be difficult to follow. Results can be conflicting. But there are ways to bring some clarity to the chaos.

Google provides a number of pointers for how its search engine works via its Page Quality Rating Guidelines. This is a massive document that used to be privy to Google employees only. Now that it’s public, it enables marketers and SEO experts to better inform their proactive SEO strategies.

There are several key areas of the document that shed light on how Google evaluates your website. For instance, it’s important to understand key concepts, like YMYL pages. These are ‘Your Money or Your Life‘ pages, which contain important information to help readers make critical decisions. Due to their higher degree of importance, Google grades these pages with a more stringent, high-quality standard. That means you need to keep them impeccably informed and up-to-date (more on that further down).

E-A-T is another essential element of Google ranking. The acronym stands for expertise, authority, and trust — a trio of elements that help define how high to rank a web page.

Google’s Page Quality Rating Guidelines may be extensive, comprehensive, and a bit overwhelming. But you don’t need to read it cover to cover every quarter. Instead, familiarize yourself with many of the basic concepts. And, of course, keep it bookmarked for easy reference so that it can continue to inform your SEO strategy in the future.

2. Build each piece of content thoughtfully from the get-go

Everyone and their mother knows about the importance of keywords and linking in SEO. The problem is when you fail to address these critical content components in the planning phase — i.e. before you actually make your content.

Now, this is where things can get tricky. If you focus entirely on things like keywords, it’s easy to over-prioritize SEO at the expense of the reader — and that is always a bad strategy. 

Good SEO comes from putting the reader first and the search engines second. That naturally creates content that better satisfies the searcher’s intent. This has the effect of boosting critical SEO criteria, like dwell time …which ends up boosting your SEO in the long run anyway.

Even so, it’s important to factor things like keywords and linking into your initial content creation strategy. A good way to do this while still prioritizing your audience is by using the following steps:

  • Search for important keywords and phrases related to your audience: What is your target demographic searching for? What answers or advice do they need? One easy way to see this is by looking up generic keywords from your audience and checking the “Related searches” section at the bottom of the SERPs. Use this to guide what content you create.
  • Choose additional keywords: Use a keyword planner to add other keywords to your initial topic. Don’t be excessive. Just use a handful of additional terms to help your content stand out in search results.
  • Create complete content: When you go to create the content itself, try to make it as comprehensive as possible. Complete content refers to something that doesn’t just answer an initial inquiry but any follow-up questions, as well.
  • Add internal links: Finally, remember to link to other areas of your site throughout each piece. Consistently linking to important pages can tie your site together and help it perform better.

By planning keywords and links ahead of time, you can ensure that you optimize each piece of content right out of the gate.

3. Cultivate existing content

It’s tempting to dive right into creating fresh, new content that is SEO-friendly. But let’s stop for a minute and think things through.

If your current site is already performing poorly, creating better content is only going to solve part of the problem. Many chronic SEO issues are a site-wide affair. In fact, Google has clarified that thin content (that is, content without much value) doesn’t apply to individual posts. It’s a site-wide problem.

That means if you start the proactive SEO process by creating new content, it’s going to have to overcome the flaws of your past low-quality content before it can really start to lift your site out of the SEO gutter.

Instead, as you study Google’s search engine guidelines and gain a better grasp of how to improve your SEO, start the reformation process by assessing the state of your current content. Conduct a review of the existing content on your site by asking these questions:

As you go along, try to identify YMYL pages. Remember, those are the pages that contain high value for readers — and which consequently tend to be graded on a higher curve. Make a list of these and check in on them from time to time to keep them at peak value.

Don’t leave SEO to chance

SEO is a powerful tool that can make or break your online content. It’s not the kind of thing that you want to leave to chance. It’s also hard to overcome by reacting to poor SEO after the fact.

Instead, take control of your SEO by using the suggestions above. Start by familiarizing yourself with Google’s guidelines. Then create a sound strategy to guide each new piece of content. Finally, review your existing site (especially any YMYL pages) to make sure you’re offering value with both past and future content.

If you can stay proactive with your SEO, you can turn it into a key element of your marketing strategy.


John Rampton is a top marketing leader and founder of Calendar. Find John on Twitter @johnrampton.

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The post SEO doesn’t have to be scary: shift from a reactive to proactive strategy appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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