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5 Social Media Advertising Tips to Nail Your Efforts and Get Your Expected Results

October 2, 2022 No Comments

Do you want your social media advertising efforts to succeed?

Of course, you do. 

According to data, brands saw 33% more purchase intent from exposure to LinkedIn ads.

The figure highlights how ads are more than just one of the social media marketing trends of 2022

With the right strategies, social media ads can help you raise awareness, boost website traffic, generate leads, and grow your sales. 

Jumpstart your efforts to optimize social media advertising with the five tips below. 

Let’s get right to it. 

1. Set Clear Social Media Advertising Goals

Reaching your goals is challenging if you don’t have a clear set of objectives to run your social media ads. 

You need to know what you want your social media advertising efforts to achieve since this will shape and inform your strategy. 

It can also help you choose the right tools, audiences to target, and the best platforms to run your ads.

For example, if your goal is to boost your engagement rate, you could run ads with trending or popular quotes on TikTok

It’s one way of drawing more eyeballs to your ads while engaging audiences with familiar content.   

Your social media advertising goals can include the following:

  • Raise awareness
  • Expand your brand’s reach
  • Drive traffic social traffic to your website
  • Boost your engagement rate
  • Generate more leads, clicks, and downloads
  • Increase your conversions and sales 

Once you’ve identified your goals, you can start looking for the best-fitting tools to help you implement your ad strategy and reach your targets. 

Consider platforms such as Vista Social. 

The social media management platform helps you plan, organize, prioritize, and schedule your content posting with its content calendar and auto-publishing features. 

Image source: vistasocial.com.

Identify your social media advertising objectives to determine how to best implement your strategy. 

Your goals can also tell you what metrics to track and measure to assess your ad’s performance. 

2. Understand Your Audience and How They Spend Their Time Online

Get the best bang for your buck by targeting audiences who need or want your products, services, and offers in your ads. 

After all, you’re not likely to achieve your social media ad campaign goals if you advertise to the wrong audience. 

For instance, running ads about your UI/UX software to people looking for reliable security testing tools won’t get you conversions. 

Know your target audience by developing personas (or refining your existing ideal buyer personas). 

It can help you understand the people and segments to target and focus your social advertising efforts on. 

Use Facebook Audience Insights to get an overview of your target audience demographics, interests, liked pages, activities, etc. 

Understanding your ideal buyers can help you to tailor your social media ads to their pain points and needs. It can increase the chances of your audiences clicking on your ads and acting on your offers. 

It also helps to know how your audiences spend their time online, including the social media platforms they frequent. 

Doing so gives you a good idea of the social media channels you should focus on and the content types that appeal to your potential customers. 

For instance, most younger audiences (teenagers to early 30s) are on Instagram. Visual elements such as images and videos work best for running ads on the platform. 

Determine your ideal buyers’ preferences, main interests, and the platform on which they’re most active.

Use the information to create social media ads that cater to your target audience’s needs, making your content irresistible. 

3. Learn About Your Social Advertising Options

While casting a wide net by advertising on multiple social media platforms can have certain benefits, it can also be tedious and resource-draining.

The key is to focus on at least three social media platforms to run your advertising campaigns. It can help you avoid stretching your team and resources too thin while getting results.  

Run ads on the following platforms depending on your social media advertising goals, target audiences, and campaigns.

  • Facebook. You can run various ad formats on Facebook, including videos, photos, and carousels that display on users’ news feeds. Other FB advertisement options are Messenger and Story ads. 

Facebook also offers the Lookalike audiences feature that lets you create targeted ads based on your known audiences or existing customers.  

Image source: mention.com
  • Instagram. Instagram offers similar ad formats and audience targeting features as Facebook under Meta Business.

For example, you can run an IG Story ad on how customers can buy SEO articles as part of your efforts to promote your SEO marketing services.

  • Twitter. Select or create a tweet that you want Twitter to show people who are not following you to advertise on the platform. You can choose audiences to target based on user behavior, demographics, interests, and who they follow.  

The Twitter Promote option can advertise your tweets with a monthly charge. 

  • TikTok. You can run TikTok video ads with brand filters and branded hashtags. TikTok also provides an automated creative optimization feature. It tests combinations of your video, copy, and images to the ads that work best for you.  

Focus on running ads on the social media platforms that make the most sense for you. 

Follow content writing time-tested tips to help you create compelling ad copies and Calls-to-Action (CTAs). 

4. Test Your Social Media Ads

Test your various social media ads to assess and improve their performance. 

Start A/B testing several ads initially with small audiences. It can help you determine the ads (and ad elements) that work best and use the top-performing ad in your main campaign. 

You get instant feedback with social media, so you can learn what ads work (and don’t) for your brand faster. 

Use a reliable social media ad analytics tool to test your ads and make improvements efficiently. 

For instance, Facebook offers a built-in A/B testing feature for your ads.  

Image source: hubspot.com

A/B testing takes away the guesswork on what ad element or variation you need to tweak and improve to get better results. 

5. Track and Measure Social Media Ad Results and Performance

Tracking and measuring your social media ad performance can tell you if you’ve reached your targets. 

You’ll know whether your social media ads perform well (or not) and what aspects worked and didn’t work. It gives you the information you need to improve your ads moving forward. 

Measure your results to get reliable data about your ad’s value to your company, such as leads and purchases, and prove Return on Investment (ROI) or Return on Ad Spend (ROAS). 

Develop a well-thought-out content tracking strategy to help monitor and assess your social media ads’ performance and returns. 

It can also help you determine if your ads contribute to your entire social media marketing efforts. 

Nail Your Social Media Advertising

Social media advertising isn’t as easy as pie, but it’s not rocket science. 

Kick off your efforts with this guide’s social media advertising tips to set you on the path to success. 

Continue learning, testing, and improving to run effective social media ads that help you reach your targets and get the results you expect. 

The post 5 Social Media Advertising Tips to Nail Your Efforts and Get Your Expected Results first appeared on PPC Hero.

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How upskilling your paid advertising skills will tackle economic downturns

September 29, 2022 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Marketing budgets are often the first to be slashed in a downturn – upskilling your existing team with digital marketing techniques can provide huge efficiencies and minimize the impact of cuts
  • Creating an upskilling program does not need to be expensive or time-consuming if a well-thought-out strategy is adopted and results are constantly measured
  • Nurturing your own in-house talent pool also increases business resilience, improves marketing innovation and creativity, and reduces reliance on third-party operators
  • Choosing the right skills for your team to acquire depends both on your immediate goals and long-term business strategy – done right you can steal a march on your competitors
  • Sarah Gilchriest, Global COO of Circus Street, discusses the key skills brands need to cultivate to stay competitive during an economic downturn

We’re entering what is likely to be a pretty tough global recession. As consumer sentiment worsens, brands will increasingly look at ways they can cut costs to protect their bottom line. Unfortunately, we all know that marketing is usually one of the first budgets to be slashed.

It is seemingly much easier to stop a campaign or give an agency notice than it is to sack a developer or reduce infrastructure costs. However, more often than not, cutting marketing is a false economy that worsens the impact of a downturn by slowing a company’s growth. So, is there a way for brands to instead maximize their digital marketing output while also freezing or reducing costs?

The answer may be found in upskilling.

Training while cutting costs?

Now, your first reaction may be that training programs are expensive luxuries that make little sense if your goal is to cut costs. There are a few things to unpack here –

  1. Size and scope of training matter. You can make an outsized impact by training one or two individuals who then share their knowledge with their wider team. The right strategy (which I’ll discuss further below) can lead to a highly targeted program that gives the most critical skills to those who will be best placed to use them immediately.
  2. Next, there are a lot of freely available supporting resources that can significantly reduce costs and help to embed learning.
  3. Finally, let’s put costs in perspective. The ROI on a well-executed training scheme pays for itself and the initial outlay pales in comparison to most other business functions. Put simply, you get a lot of bang for your buck. 

Why paid advertising skills?

Paid advertising makes a lot of sense to focus on for a number of reasons. Generally, compared to other marketing fields, paid advertising is characterized by the sheer diversity of skills and techniques needed to fully execute a campaign. It is incredibly fast-moving and often requires you to leverage a number of different tech platforms. Consequently, many brands outsource this functionality to a network of agencies and freelancers. Those that don’t usually rely on one or two individual ‘power users’ or worse, skills are haphazardly spread among a range of departments leading to bottlenecks and single points of failure.

As such, digital advertising is usually the prime area where efficiencies, greater innovation, and marketing effectiveness can occur via upskilling. It is where your business can do much more for less. 

Identifying the right skills

Getting the right skill mix is where the rubber meets the road. A mixture of creativity, data analysis, platform knowledge, development techniques, and marketing expertise are all needed. To get started the best approach is to fully understand what capability your team has in-house. The crucial element is to remember that a lot of ability might be hidden because it is not used on a day-to-day basis. You would be surprised at how quickly a business ‘forgets’ about the previous experiences of team members after they have been hired.

Auditing team skills should expand beyond the marketing department

You don’t know what gems are lurking in other areas of your business until you start to look. This is also the perfect opportunity to identify both the potential of your employees to acquire new skills and also their individual aspirations. It is much easier to upskill someone who has a professional and personal investment in learning that particular expertise. The audit itself does not need to be complex – a simple matrix that enables people to categorize their proficiency and outline the areas where they would like to develop will suffice.

When you know what you have to work with, then it’ll become much easier to define the best way forward. Deciding the best skill mix comes down to first working out how to fulfill your most immediate needs. For example, taking a costly service in-house, plugging a weakness – where a team member’s departure would severely hamper your ability to function, or obvious gaps in ability that prevent you from undertaking certain digital advertising activities.

Build on the compatibility between your employee’s aspirations and your commercial objectives

This is then overlaid by areas where your marketing output can most obviously be improved and your future aspirations in line with your commercial objectives. For example, if in the future you want to more heavily target users on particular social media platforms or ‘exotic’ platforms like IoT devices and digital boards. Perhaps you can see the financial benefits of adopting headless CMS tech and would like to put in place the skills needed to make that transition after the recession. Maybe you want your team to have the insight to tell you whether the Metaverse has any potential for your business.

This may sound complex but once you get started the hierarchy of skills you need more often than not becomes very obvious. Remember, one of upskilling’s great strengths is its flexibility – if your needs change or you feel you have chosen the wrong skills – it’s very easy to change track.

Getting started in a cost-efficient way

How you train your team is very much up to individual preferences – everyone learns in different ways. Speaking to your employees and specialists will enable you to build a tailored teaching structure. It can be a combination of in-house learning, online tutorials, accredited programs, or book learning. You do not have to go all in on a full program straight away. Piloting can remove a lot of the risk. Start small – one team or a handful of individuals from across your company – and continually assess the impact.

A mistake to avoid

A common mistake businesses make is they wait too long to get their team to use their new knowledge. This can hold up the process and damage ROI. The best way to embed new skills is to apply them. Ensure that your team has an opportunity to practice their newfound expertise on real initiatives. Then keep a close eye on your business metrics – including team and customer feedback – to determine the impact. Unlike many other departments, digital marketing can have very clear outputs. This will let you know quite quickly if it is working. From there, you can decide on how to roll out your training scheme. 

Marketing doesn’t end with the marketers

As I’ve mentioned, diversifying the skillset of your team builds resilience and promotes more innovation. The reason is simple, if you only have marketing skills in your marketing department, you are naturally limiting the number of people who can provide useful insights that fuel innovation. You reduce oversight and feedback loops, and your marketing output will suffer from a lack of outside perspectives. 

By making your teams multidisciplinary and cross-functional you can spread useful skills throughout your business. Customer service teams can learn the fundamentals of digital marketing, marketers know how to do the basic dev and data work to enable their day-to-day, and your data teams can think like marketers if they need to.

Preparing for the worst doesn’t mean losing capabilities

If the worst does happen and you do need to make cuts to your team, having key skills shared across your business means that the damage to core functions will be limited.

To finish – I should highlight that much of what I’ve discussed applies equally to business owners as it does to individual freelancers. A downturn can be a daunting prospect if you are a sole trader. Upskilling can be one of the best ways to increase your value to clients now and future-proof your business.

If you have seen business drop off, the time you now have available could be best dedicated to more training. This may sound obvious, but a mistake many people make in their careers is failing to adapt to how demand for skills can quickly change or technology can come along that makes them obsolete. Adding more skill strings to you and your company’s bow is never a bad thing.


Sarah Gilchriest is the Global COO of Circus Street.

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The post How upskilling your paid advertising skills will tackle economic downturns appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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The inner workings of search advertising in a cookieless world

September 13, 2022 No Comments

The inner workings of search advertising in a cookieless world

30-second summary:

  • As third-party cookies will eventually phase out and marketers search for alternate approaches, they may find themselves lost in a sea of data when attempting to measure and evaluate the impact
  • Focusing on the quality of users instead of attributable conversions can mitigate the inconvenience of losing third-party cookies
  • The shift from cookies to a new engagement model will require constant testing, so keep data simple where possible

For years now, digital marketers have been spoiled by third-party cookies and the ability to accurately track engagement – it has made life simple, and reporting a campaign’s activity a breeze. Such an approach has allowed us to easily see how many conversions Meta, Criteo, or an influencer has contributed to with minimal effort. But the eventual demise of third-party cookies demands accurate data on engagement to ensure that the transition to new identifiers can be as clear as possible. However, due to either ignorance or convenience, many advertisers still take overly positive and blindly optimistic metrics as the truth.

Counting your chickens before they’ve converted

If we take Facebook for example, they have no way of knowing to what extent their services contributed to a conversion. There are many ways of producing wildly inflated numbers, such as having several touch points and one conversion being associated with multiple channels, or even inaccuracies from false positives. This is particularly troubling for those engaging in heavy remarketing based on past users who already have visited or interacted with a site. One must ask the question – when working with inaccurate metrics, will remarketing actually contribute to further conversions or will it simply attribute miss-clicks to campaigns that don’t increase revenue?

We as humans love to oversimplify things, especially complex patterns. Imagine how complex a visit is to your webpage – you get a session that is connected to a user, that considers different attributes such as age, gender, location, interests as well as their current activity on your site. That user data is then sent to, for example, Google Ads, in a remarketing list.

Even the remarketing list provides a notable variable when trying to make sense of conversions. Facebook and Google users are not 1:1, with one user on Google often being connected to more devices and browsers than the average Facebook user. You could get a conversion from a device that Google has connected to the same user, while Facebook may lack any insight.

With each user visiting your website you populate remarketing lists. Those remarketing lists build “lookalikes” in Facebook and “similar” in Google. These “similars” can be extremely useful, as although traffic from one channel could be attributed to zero to no conversions, they could in fact help build the most efficient “similars” in Google Ads that can then drive a large number of cheap conversions.

Identify data that helps you steer clear of over-attribution

All automated optimization efforts, whether they be the campaign budget optimization (CBO) or Target CPA are dependent on data. The more data you feed the machines the better results you get. The bigger your remarketing lists, the more efficient your automatic/smart campaigns will be on Google. This is what makes the value of a user so multifaceted and incredibly complex, even when you don’t take the action impression of an ad into account.

With this incredible complexity, we need to have an attribution model that can genuinely portray engagement data without inflating or underselling a campaign’s conversions. However, while there may be many models that are well suited to produce the most accurate results, it should be remembered that attribution is by itself flawed. As consumers, we understand that the actions that drive us to conversions in our personal lives are varied, with so many things that can’t be tracked enough to be attributed. While attribution cannot be perfect, it is essentially the best tool available and can become far more useful when applied alongside other data points.

The last non-direct click attribution model

When trying to avoid inflated data, the easiest attribution model is a last non-direct click. With this model, all direct traffic is ignored and all the credit for the conversion goes to the last channel that the customer clicked through, ultimately preventing any conversions from being falsely attributed to multiple touchpoints. It is a simple model that only considers the bare minimum that still manages to solve the problems of over-attribution by being direct. This way, marketers can measure the effect rather than attributing parts of conversion to different campaigns or channels. It really is a very straightforward approach; essentially, “if we do this to x, does that increase y?”. Of course, like all attribution models, the last non-direct click approach has its downsides. For one, it’s not a perfect solution to over/under contribution, but it is an easily replicable and strategically sound approach that provides reliable data where you can measure everything in one place.

In any case, the delayed death of the third-party cookie is certainly causing many to reevaluate their digital advertising methodologies. For now, proactive marketers will continue to search for privacy-friendly identifiers that can provide alternative solutions. First-party data could well have a larger role to play if consent from users can be reliably gained. While we wait for the transition, getting your data in order and finding accurate, reliable approaches to attribution must be a priority.

Ensuring the accuracy of this data is therefore imperative, this can be achieved by ensuring there are no discrepancies between clicks and sessions whilst all webpages are accurately tracked. In the absence of auto-tracking, UTMs should also be used to track all campaigns and, if possible, tracking should be server-side. Finally, marketers should test their tracking with Tag Assistant, and make sure they don’t create duplicate sessions or lose parameters during the session. Ultimately, once the third-party cookie becomes entirely obsolete, which direction marketers go in will ultimately be decided by data – which must be as accurate as possible.


Torkel Öhman is CTO and co-founder of Amanda AI. Responsible for building Amanda AI, with his experience in data/analytics, Torkel oversees all technical aspects of the product ensuring all ad accounts run smoothly.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

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The post The inner workings of search advertising in a cookieless world appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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Search Advertising 2.0 is Here. Did You Adjust Yet?

August 26, 2022 No Comments

Suppose you are a data-driven search marketer and want to maintain significant control of your main advertising assets such as keywords and ad copy. In that case, you must be disoriented by the trajectory that search advertising platforms, particularly Google, are taking. Starting on June 30, 2022, Google no longer allows the creation or editing of expanded text ads, leaving only responsive search ads as an option.

Last year in 2021, a similar move was made around broad match modified keywords. Everything indicates that the industry is going towards more machine learning-driven optimization, with fewer possibilities of manual control. The introduction of performance max campaigns demonstrates it as well. This presents new opportunities and challenges to face. How do you ensure that your ads are as efficient as possible when Google has more and more flexibility on what to deliver?

Understanding Machine Learning Optimizations

I think about an algorithm as a huge calculator that can process a lot of data in a matter of seconds. The key here is “a lot of data”. The easy trap to fall into is not to give your algorithm enough data to work with. In the instance of Google Ads, we can look at it at the ad group level to determine whether enough data is being collected. Your responsive search ad as well as your keywords function at that level, which is the reason why we look at ad groups.

You want to be careful about over-segmenting your ad groups, which could result in your responsive search ad not receiving enough impressions and clicks to optimize efficiently. When you have 15 headlines and 4 descriptions, that represents a lot of possibility for testing and Google needs to reach statistical significance for the ads to work well. To illustrate the problem with limited data, you can always refer to what happens when you create a new account.

In one of our accounts advertising apartments, we tested a full responsive search ad approach along with smart bidding and broad keywords. We realized very quickly that Google started delivering ads for location keywords completely irrelevant to where our apartment complex was. We took a rather extreme approach in giving Google full control and found out correlatedly that our account was for sure not ready for that. That said, when your account has enough data, things can go in the opposite direction, and that’s where you will fall in love with smart optimization.

If You Give it Enough Data, It Will Work

On the other hand, we did a similar test with an account with a history of recorded conversions. We were more diligent with the approach as we created a campaign where only a few broad match keywords were implemented within a single ad group with one responsive search ad. In essence, the campaign setup did leverage full machine learning-driven optimization but it had less to optimize at once and operated within an account that had historical data to work with. The results below were recorded during the first 3 months and were fantastic.

Campaign Cost Conversions Cost/click Cost/conversion
Test Campaign(One Ad Group, 2 broad keywords, audience targeting) $ 2,8k 21 $ 2.88 $ 133
Control Campaign(11 ad groups, 50+ keywords, audience targeting) $ 1,6k 21 $ 2.46 $ 77

The cost/conversion was reduced by ~70%, changing nothing else than the campaign structure. This tells you the importance of structuring your campaign appropriately as we transition to smart bidding, responsive search ads, and more utilization of broad keywords.

What if You Still Need To Segment Your Campaigns?

The question is then, do you really need to? Or did you get used to a methodology that you struggle getting away from? If the answer is that you need some ad copy control for example, which is fair and not rare, then you want to make sure that each of your ad groups have enough data to work with. This is true for impressions, clicks, and conversions – but you can give yourself an arbitrary number to commit to such as 10k impressions per month in any ad group. So you still can have multiple ad groups, but just keep in mind that they will need food (data) to survive and stay healthy.

Conclusion: Automated Optimizations are Here to Stay

Computers are getting faster and better at calculating, so it is natural that search advertising platforms will continue to implement machine learning-driven campaign types and optimizations. Privacy has become critical for consumers in recent years and that implies that advertisers will see less data as well. Understanding how to navigate the new search advertising era with fewer data and more leverage for computers will be key success drivers.

The post Search Advertising 2.0 is Here. Did You Adjust Yet? first appeared on PPC Hero.

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Here’s what an ROI-worthy search advertising budget looks like in 2022

March 18, 2022 No Comments

Here’s what an ROI-worthy search advertising budget looks like in 2022

30-second summary:

  • Digital marketers experience a potential ROI tunnel vision when it comes to search advertising
  • Seriously, do you need to burn dollars over those high-competition keywords? Does it trickle down into actual business?
  • How do you not lose vision and outweigh the paid search cost with your revenue?
  • We’re bringing you the finer details of designing a paid media budget straight from an SEO expert and serial entrepreneur

It’s a bit of an understatement to say that success in digital marketing depends on a whole lot of things. There’s your skill-set, your team that helps you, and your understanding of the market where you’re trying to make a dent, either for yourself or your clients.

But how often do you think about your budget? Specifically, we’re talking about your search advertising budget here.

On its face, running paid media ads on Google Ads, the Google Display Network, Facebook, Microsoft, and other platforms is pretty simple: you bid on your keywords, define your target audiences, and run your ads for the length of the campaign.

You might not think that your budget factors into things beyond showing you the funds you have to work with, but I argue that there’s more to it than that, especially when every dollar counts and you have a potential tunnel vision on ROI.

The thing is, only you will be able to say ultimately what your ROI-worthy search advertising budget will look like this year, but in this article, I’ll explain how to design your paid media budget to strike gold in 2022.

The basics: What do you want?

So, you want to know what your search advertising budget should look like in 2022.

Let me ask you this first: who are you, how big is your business, how much do you have to devote to search advertising, and, most importantly of all, what do you want to accomplish?

There are so many factors here that only you will know, but the questions I’d ask myself if I were looking at designing a search advertising budget for 2022 would include:

  • What do I want out of my campaigns?
  • How many conversions can I reasonably expect to get from my campaigns?
  • Is search advertising my only growth channel right now, or are there others?
  • How much will I also be putting into SEO or email?
  • How can I track my search advertising to make sure my performance is what I expect?
  • What will success look like?

Your budget is going to reflect what you want out of your campaigns, and what you want should reflect what growth looks like to your business.

For instance, are you an affiliate-marketing blogger who just needs more eyeballs on your pages? Are you a law firm looking for real, honest form-fills? Are you an ecommerce brand that’s retargeting your audiences for products they’ve viewed?

All of it matters, because your approach to your search advertising, and consequently your budgeting, will be determined by your goals.

Closing in: What do you need?

After figuring out what you want, it’s time to think of what you need to get there. Here’s where we’ll talk about hard figures: budgeting.

Only you will know what your search advertising campaigns should be producing (the results ideally will be based on the goals you’ve laid out).

So, if you want to grow by, let’s say, $ 2,000 a month, then you need to do some math to get there.

How many leads does your current search advertising campaign bring in? Of those leads, how many convert? Knowing your conversion rate will be key, as will knowing what each lead is worth to you and what your cost per lead is.

When you figure these things out, you’ll have a better idea of how to budget.

If a conversion will bring you $ 500, and your cost per lead is $ 10, and your conversion rate is five percent, then you need to bring in 80 leads a month through search advertising.

Here’s how it works.

You need four conversions a month to hit your $ 2,000 goal. You convert five percent of the leads you get. Four is 5% of 80. You, therefore, need 80 leads per month to reach your goal.

And if you pay $ 10 per lead, then your budget should be $ 800 a month for search advertising.

Now, that’s an ideal situation. That’s assuming you can make it all happen consistently like that, month after month.

In the perfect world, that budget will indeed be ROI-worthy.

But campaigns may fail, certain methods may not follow through for you.

How can you ensure your budgeting and efforts are worthwhile?

Pulling it together: Get smart about bidding

You want to design an ROI-worthy search advertising budget for 2022. That means you want to be in the big leagues like your competitors. What do you think they’re doing that you aren’t? Do they have some insight into Google Ads that you don’t?

No, it really comes down to your keyword strategy for your ads.

In case you didn’t know, it works like this in SEO, too: the more mainstream, general, and competitive keywords – such as “SEO company” – are going to be pretty expensive to bid on. Depending on your budget, you may not be able to sustain that kind of campaign for long, and it’s going to end up as a lot of wasted dollars.

But again, look at your similarly sized competitors. They probably have roughly the same budget as you do. If they’re outperforming you, they may have a smarter keyword bidding strategy than you do.

Taking the example from above, maybe you don’t want or need to rank your ads for “SEO company.”

A longer-tail keyword such as “SEO agency for link building” will cost you less and have fewer monthly searches. But as in any sales funnel, when searchers get more specific, they tend to be more ready to convert.

Just remember that when you get more specific, you’re going to want to hone in on the quality and relevance of your ads’ corresponding landing pages.

A long-tail keyword search requires a long-tail ad, and a long-tail ad requires a long-tail landing page (so to speak). Be sure to deliver on what your ad promises. Surely, you can develop content related to hiring an SEO agency for link building.

Think of those funnels here. People want to see content related to where they are in the buyer’s journey. When they see it, they will be more ready to convert. It works the same in SEO.

If you want to talk about really honing in on ROI with your search advertising, that’s the way to do it.

What will you do next?

Many businesses spend between seven and 12 percent of their annual budget on marketing. It’s a necessary expenditure for growth.

If you want to make sure that whatever you spend on your search advertising this year is actually worthy of a satisfactory ROI, study the tips I have laid out. Know your strengths, what you can do, and your bidding limitations, as well.

If you’re smart, you can really build something great.


Kris Jones is the founder and former CEO of digital marketing and affiliate network Pepperjam, which he sold to eBay Enterprises in 2009. Most recently Kris founded SEO services and software company LSEO.com and has previously invested in numerous successful technology companies. Kris is an experienced public speaker and is the author of one of the best-selling SEO books of all time called, ‘Search-Engine Optimization – Your Visual Blueprint to Effective Internet Marketing’, which has sold nearly 100,000 copies.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post Here’s what an ROI-worthy search advertising budget looks like in 2022 appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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6 Tips to Get TikTok Advertising to the Next Level

February 28, 2022 No Comments

Where do you start with TikTok advertising and marketing? We’ve listed six essential tips to ensure your TikTok advertising reaches the next level. Read on!

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Content Marketing and PPC Advertising: Better Together

February 3, 2022 No Comments

Content marketing and PPC advertising are most powerful when used together to supplement SEO and sales strategies. How can you get the most from your content?

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Six Best Practices in Programmatic Advertising to Increase Brand Reputation

December 22, 2021 No Comments

Learn how to boost brand reputation with the help of these 6 simple programmatic advertising best practices.

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Five Best PPC Advertising Strategies in 2021

December 2, 2021 No Comments

Source Being one of the fastest ways for drawing new visitors to a website, PPC marketing is also one of the most powerful tools for attracting a target audience and business development. Although it goes hand in hand with SEO marketing, the main difference is that it is not organic but paid. Therefore, it brings […]

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2021 Amazon Advertising Trends

August 19, 2021 No Comments

Learn about new advertising trends on Amazon. How effective are different types of advertising tools and what has been the experience of sellers using them.

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