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The importance of accurate keyword difficulty scores

July 17, 2021 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Keyword difficulty (KD) scores help digital marketers understand potential search engine performance
  • KD scores are useful in building SEO strategies, filtering out ineffective keywords
  • Low competition keywords give an advantage in attracting traffic
  • Some KD calculating tools may be inaccurate due to the use of limited parameters
  • Semrush has developed a new formula for KD score calculations that it says has improved accuracy

With countless companies competing for the same audience, digital marketers need to develop a highly effective and targeted content strategy to find a way through the crowded market and connect with potential customers. Keyword difficulty (KD) is an essential metric to assist marketers in formulating an effective SEO strategy for reaching the top of search engine results pages (SERP).

Focusing on a keyword with a low KD score can achieve faster results with traffic from search engines as there is less competition. Whereas keywords with a higher KD score will typically have far more competition in search results, making it much harder to appear near the top of SERPs in the short term. Long-term improvements are achievable but will take time and require multiple SEO measures to be implemented.

KD calculation tools can determine how effective a keyword may be in search results. However, a lot can depend on the SEO tools that digital marketers are using. Such tools are not always accurate due to the limited parameters that can vary from developer to developer. The result is that the KD calculation may be inaccurate and even lead a digital marketer to believe that their keywords will perform better in practice than in reality.

Content created in partnership with Semrush.

Semrush, an online visibility management platform provider, has developed what it says is a proven formula to achieve an accurate KD percentage score based on in-depth research into SEO patterns and client feedback.

How Semrush’s Keyword Difficulty platform works

This year, Semrush released an updated version of its KD metric. The new formula was the result of extensive lab testing by the company’s team of data scientists and engineers. They studied patterns of SERP activity for approximately 120,000 keywords, covering more than 100 parameters and varying contexts to determine an accurate KD value. Alongside this, the teams analyzed the data to determine the difficulty that keywords would face in using SEO to appear on the first page of search results.

The three steps to decode your SERP standing and opportunities

Semrush’s platform has three steps to calculate the formula.

1. SERP analysis

The first involves SERP analysis, where the median value is identified for three metrics throughout URLs on the first page of search results. The three median values are:

  • The number of referring domains pointing to the ranking URLs
  • The authority score of the ranking domains
  • The ratio of follow/no-follow links to the ranking URLs

2. Keyword parameter analysis

The second step is an analysis of keyword parameters. This considers the above SERP factors, alongside a closer inspection of individual keywords. All factors are weighted differently in Semrush’s formula regarding the likelihood of influencing the first-page ranking.

The parameter weighted the highest by some way is the median number of referring domains for ranking URLs, totaling 41.22 percent. While the second-largest weighted share is the median authority score for ranking domains at 16.99 percent. Search volume is third with 9.47 percent, and the median follow/no-follow ratio for ranking URLs is a fraction lower in the fourth position at 9.17 percent.

Other parameters include featured snippets, branded keywords, and site links, with the weighted share becoming progressively smaller. Factors that can harm the KD score are keywords with a high word count and no SERP features.

3. The calculations

The third step is the calculation itself. The formula also adapts for each country, taking a nation’s population size and the number of websites into account when calculating the KD score based on Semrush’s regional database.

What KD scores mean for your SEO performance

On Semrush’s KD platform, the user can enter up to 100 keywords at a time to check the KD score. Crucially, the platform can help the user find valuable low-competition keywords. KD scores can also be calculated for both long-tail and local keywords. In addition, the tool allows the user to compare their SEO strategy with competitors to see what is performing well and identify any keyword gaps.

The results provide the user with the KD rating and advice on what they need to do next to gain hits. At the lower end of the scale, scores of 0-14 percent are classed “very easy” with the strongest likelihood of new pages appearing near the top of Google rankings without the need for backlinks.

The next step up is 15-29 percent, which is considered “easy”. While there may be some competition, it remains possible to achieve a high ranking for new web pages. However, this will require quality content based on the keywords.

Things get progressively harder as the KD scores get higher. A score of 85-100 percent, for example, is classified “very hard”, where keywords face the strongest competition and the odds are stacked against new websites breaking through. A ranking is still possible through features such as on-page SEO, link building, and campaigns to promote content. In this instance, pay-per-click advertising may prove more beneficial.


To find out more about Semrush and its Keyword Difficulty platform download its recent whitepaper.

The post The importance of accurate keyword difficulty scores appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Search Engine Watch


The Importance of Educating Clients in the PPC Marketing Industry

February 27, 2021 No Comments

When a Search Marketing Agency pitches a new client, they may provide them a complimentary audit, initial strategy overview, competitive analysis, etc… However, once the client signs on the dotted line and the work begins, more often than not, overt time the client slips into the dark with regard to the specifics. These specifics consist of the day-to-day “blocking and tackling” of PPC. (keyword matching, search queries, ctr%, quality score, competitive bidding, affiliate hijacking, etc…). When something goes wrong with an account (and is always does), the PPC Marketer/Agency needs to explain the cause and effect and it is that situation where the client needs to know what they hell they are talking about.

In this post, I will discuss some specific instances where it’s in the best interest of both parties to educate one another in order to not only grow the business, but to keep the relationship from turning sour.

Discuss What Metrics Matter Most

Regardless of how seasoned a client/prospect might be with regard to “PPC metric lingo”, it’s in the best interest of both parties to explain which metrics matter the most and why. Sometimes, Adwords metrics such as interactions, engagement rates, etc… are not exactly accurate on measuring success. Success is should identified by conversions. For example, take this scenario.

  • Increased Impressions: In general, one might think this is a good thing but depending on the targeting and platform, absolutely NOT and here’s why.
    • Search Networks: More impressions can reduce the CTR% which in turn lower Quality Score and hence, result in higher costs and worse AVG Position. This also results in additional “irrelevant” traffic that will drive up budgets and lower the overall Cost/Conversion.
    • Display Networks: Depending on the bidding options, (especially CPM) an increase in impressions will only drive up costs. Need to make sure CPC is set to this option.

The Influence of Competitors:

When a company enters the world of PPC Marketing, they will encounter competitors not only bidding on similar keywords, but also their “sacred” brand terms and this can have a detrimental effect on the overall performance of the account. It’s important to keep a watchful eye on this and develop strategies to counteract this problem. Here are some strategies to protect the brand:

  • Make sure the client files their trademark with Google to ensure no one else can use their trademarked term in text Ads.
  • Send an email/letter to all Affiliates and Resellers that they are NOT permitted to bid on the trademarked name in any of their Text/Banner Ads.
  • Contact competitors directly and ask them to stop bidding on their trademark terms. (if they do not oblige, getting legal assistance would be beneficial)

Attribution of other Online or Offline Advertising

Attribution can be a tricky thing to interpret, especially to a client, but it’s imperative to tell a story that makes sense. Understanding attribution varies depending on the life cycle of the client (history, offline advertising, social media presence, etc..). Typically, a new advertiser will have to rely on “non-brand” terms to drive the most relevant traffic to their product or service. Once history as been accumulated and more people get familiar with the brand, consumers will ultimately type in their brand name (Search Engine, Direct/Bookmark) to get to their site.

The client needs to understand that it will take time to grow their brand and that this is a revolving cycles. For example, “non-branded” terms are more costly and do not provide many conversions so we automatically want to pause the campaign. Bad Idea! Quite often, the “non-brand” terms are the first point of contact that introduce the brand. Yes, it costs more money, does not result in an immediate conversion, but over time it’s what generated the customer.

Importance of “After-the-Click”

Perfecting the fundamentals of Quality Score in a campaign is a good thing. Buuuut….. it’s only half the battle. The other half is persuading the customer to take an action and frankly that is the only thing that matters here. Even though the term “after-the-click” is simple in its meaning, execution is another story. It is this strategic obstacle that can be achieved, but requires constant and intelligent testing to ensure maximum effectiveness. Bottom line: The client needs to understand that in order to maximize their Ad dollars, they will need to the invest time and money into these strategies. The following Tactics would include:

  • A/B Landing Page Testing
  • Cart/Form Testing
  • Audience Testing
  • Promotion/Offer Testing

The Trust Factor:

It’s very easy for customers to trust the platform that they are advertising on. There is this “fuzzy / comfortable” feeling that if Google recommends it, then it must be a good strategy. However, I would strongly recommend that any of the Google’s Opportunities  (even though sometimes justified) need to be viewed as a just a suggestion, not an immediate decision. Remember, Google is a lucrative business because they want advertisers to spend more money with them. Increasing traffic and spend may sound good on paper, but they do not come with any guarantees in terms of conversions. When appropriate, clients need to understand the difference.

In Conclusion:

There is a “fine-line” that needs to be met where Agencies need to maintain control the PPC Accounts, while allowing the client to continue to interact and take part in the overall strategy. One way to overcome any potential issues is to educate them on all of the intricacies that may occur throughout the client-agency relationship. Once the client has developed a good rapport with the agency, it becomes easier to properly manage their performance expectations.


Digital Marketing Agency | Google Ads Consultant


The Importance of Educating Clients in the PPC Marketing Industry

July 1, 2020 No Comments

When a Search Marketing Agency pitches a new client, they may provide them a complimentary audit, initial strategy overview, competitive analysis, etc… However, once the client signs on the dotted line and the work begins, more often than not, overt time the client slips into the dark with regard to the specifics. These specifics consist of the day-to-day “blocking and tackling” of PPC. (keyword matching, search queries, ctr%, quality score, competitive bidding, affiliate hijacking, etc…). When something goes wrong with an account (and is always does), the PPC Marketer/Agency needs to explain the cause and effect and it is that situation where the client needs to know what they hell they are talking about.

In this post, I will discuss some specific instances where it’s in the best interest of both parties to educate one another in order to not only grow the business, but to keep the relationship from turning sour.

Discuss What Metrics Matter Most

Regardless of how seasoned a client/prospect might be with regard to “PPC metric lingo”, it’s in the best interest of both parties to explain which metrics matter the most and why. Sometimes, Adwords metrics such as interactions, engagement rates, etc… are not exactly accurate on measuring success. Success is should identified by conversions. For example, take this scenario.

  • Increased Impressions: In general, one might think this is a good thing but depending on the targeting and platform, absolutely NOT and here’s why.
    • Search Networks: More impressions can reduce the CTR% which in turn lower Quality Score and hence, result in higher costs and worse AVG Position. This also results in additional “irrelevant” traffic that will drive up budgets and lower the overall Cost/Conversion.
    • Display Networks: Depending on the bidding options, (especially CPM) an increase in impressions will only drive up costs. Need to make sure CPC is set to this option.

The Influence of Competitors:

When a company enters the world of PPC Marketing, they will encounter competitors not only bidding on similar keywords, but also their “sacred” brand terms and this can have a detrimental effect on the overall performance of the account. It’s important to keep a watchful eye on this and develop strategies to counteract this problem. Here are some strategies to protect the brand:

  • Make sure the client files their trademark with Google to ensure no one else can use their trademarked term in text Ads.
  • Send an email/letter to all Affiliates and Resellers that they are NOT permitted to bid on the trademarked name in any of their Text/Banner Ads.
  • Contact competitors directly and ask them to stop bidding on their trademark terms. (if they do not oblige, getting legal assistance would be beneficial)

Attribution of other Online or Offline Advertising

Attribution can be a tricky thing to interpret, especially to a client, but it’s imperative to tell a story that makes sense. Understanding attribution varies depending on the life cycle of the client (history, offline advertising, social media presence, etc..). Typically, a new advertiser will have to rely on “non-brand” terms to drive the most relevant traffic to their product or service. Once history as been accumulated and more people get familiar with the brand, consumers will ultimately type in their brand name (Search Engine, Direct/Bookmark) to get to their site.

The client needs to understand that it will take time to grow their brand and that this is a revolving cycles. For example, “non-branded” terms are more costly and do not provide many conversions so we automatically want to pause the campaign. Bad Idea! Quite often, the “non-brand” terms are the first point of contact that introduce the brand. Yes, it costs more money, does not result in an immediate conversion, but over time it’s what generated the customer.

Importance of “After-the-Click”

Perfecting the fundamentals of Quality Score in a campaign is a good thing. Buuuut….. it’s only half the battle. The other half is persuading the customer to take an action and frankly that is the only thing that matters here. Even though the term “after-the-click” is simple in its meaning, execution is another story. It is this strategic obstacle that can be achieved, but requires constant and intelligent testing to ensure maximum effectiveness. Bottom line: The client needs to understand that in order to maximize their Ad dollars, they will need to the invest time and money into these strategies. The following Tactics would include:

  • A/B Landing Page Testing
  • Cart/Form Testing
  • Audience Testing
  • Promotion/Offer Testing

The Trust Factor:

It’s very easy for customers to trust the platform that they are advertising on. There is this “fuzzy / comfortable” feeling that if Google recommends it, then it must be a good strategy. However, I would strongly recommend that any of the Google’s Opportunities  (even though sometimes justified) need to be viewed as a just a suggestion, not an immediate decision. Remember, Google is a lucrative business because they want advertisers to spend more money with them. Increasing traffic and spend may sound good on paper, but they do not come with any guarantees in terms of conversions. When appropriate, clients need to understand the difference.

In Conclusion:

There is a “fine-line” that needs to be met where Agencies need to maintain control the PPC Accounts, while allowing the client to continue to interact and take part in the overall strategy. One way to overcome any potential issues is to educate them on all of the intricacies that may occur throughout the client-agency relationship. Once the client has developed a good rapport with the agency, it becomes easier to properly manage their performance expectations.


Digital Marketing Agency | Google Ads Consultant


Google Top Stories Are Chosen By Importance Scores

January 4, 2020 No Comments

Changes have been made to Top Stories shown in Carousels in Google SERPs

Google made a recent announcement on its Keyword blog about top stories from non-news sites in search results. They told us about this change in the post Smarter organization of top stories in Search.

They start off the post by telling us:

People come to Search for all types of information to help them form a better understanding of the world and the topics they care about most. We’ve continued to bring new improvements to Search to help people better orient themselves around a topic and easily explore related ideas, so they can more quickly go from having a question in mind to developing deeper understanding. Now, we’re using the latest in machine learning to bring this approach to top stories in Google Search, making it easier for people to dive into the most useful, timely articles available.

They also tell us that we will see these top stories in carousels in organic search results when there are relevant and timely stories to share on a topic. Here is an example of the carousels about “top stories” involving artificial intelligence:

Artificial Intelligence Top Stories

On hearing this news, I did what I normally do when hearing about a change at Google. I went searching through Google’s patents to see if I could find a recent patent that might be related in some way. I searched for “top stories” in Google patents and came across one that was granted in March of last year.

It didn’t have all of the added features that the blog post did, but it talks about how Google might start creating news digests filled with “top stories.” What the blog post told us was an added wrinkle to this reporting of the news was the addition of machine learning approaches using tools like BERT:

To generate these groups, we use a variety of machine learning techniques including BERT models to examine the related articles and determine where one story ends and another begins. Our research has shown that clustering results into clearly-defined stories are critical in helping people easily navigate the results and identify the best content for their needs.

In addition to the added use of machine learning, we were also told about these results being more well-rounded and diverse:

We’re now also featuring key information, such as notable quotes and related opinion pieces, in the top stories carousel within Search. These different content types provide people a more well-rounded view of a news story to help them decide which angle to explore more deeply.

Google News Digest Patent

This patent granted in March of 2019 gives us a look at the framework behind the surfacing of these “top stories” results in what Google refers to as an “automated news digest.”

When Google indexes news information from news sources the content providers of that information focus upon serving news articles for the current time, to “allow a user to view the most shared news articles or news stories.”

So what does this new patent do to bring something new and different to show off news results?

We are told that what is innovative in the patent is how it captures the most interesting stories from different times based upon the use of an “importance score” for that time period.

Top news stories are selected and the second top news stories use those importance scores to rank what is shown as “top stories.”

Articles associated with the top news stories for those times are selected and displayed – a predetermined number of articles about each story may be decided upon beforehand, and the stories that are shown may also depend upon categories of interest identified in a user profile for a searcher who may be looking at those (not mentioned in the patent, but this reminds me of Google Discovery, and Google collecting categories of interest when deciding what to show for a searcher, brings me thoughts of the post How Google Might Predict Query Intent Using Contextual Histories.)

Importance Scores for News Stories in the Automated News Digest

So how do “top stories” become “top stories?”

The news digest system, during a time, may rank each of the news stories from the snapshots of times/regions/languages. For instance, the news digest system determines a score for each of the news stories that represent the news story’s importance. The news digest system may use an importance score of each of the news stories to determine the score.

Each snapshot in the database includes data that represents a region, a language, or both.

The news story ranking process may decide that the news stories A-B for snapshot A are specific to a region M and a language N, such as North America or the United States, and English.

The news story ranking process determines another snapshot for a different region, such as the United Kingdom, or another language, such as French or Spanish.

News stories snapshots

Importance Scores for Top Stories

The importance score for a particular news story may be included in the same snapshot that identifies the particular news story. These are the things considered in the creation of such importance scores:

  • A number of articles written about a news story (when each news story relates to a general event such as snow in Washington, D.C. and the separate articles were published by different news distributors)
  • A cumulative number of clicks on articles about a news story
  • A cumulative number of social actions (shares, likes, etc.)
  • A cumulative number of queries received from user devices for which articles for a news story are responsive, are selected, or both
  • A rate of change of a metric for a news story (when the metric may be clicks, queries, social actions)
  • A time, recency or freshness of publication related to a news story
  • An expertise of a publisher in a certain news topic or geographic area (when the publisher published an article related to the news story)
  • A historical click rate on articles from the publisher
  • Citations made to the article and/or publisher
  • Relevance of article to the news story
  • Another appropriate metric
  • A combination of two or more of these to determine the score for the news story

The news digest system may use any number of relevant signals to determine a score and corresponding ranking of the news stories.

The importance scores are used to rank new stories like this:

The news digest system uses the scores to rank the news stories. For instance, the news digest system may determine that a news story A for the digest time period, e.g., Jan. 30, 2016, has a lower score than the news stories B through H 108b-h as indicated by the news story A not being presented in the news story ranking

Importance Scores for news stories flowchar

Advantages of this Automated News Digest Patent

A news digest system may:

  • Provide a user with more unbiased news: may require little or no editorial judgment compared to systems that have an editorial review of news stories
  • Provide news digests irrespective of the digest time period, the region for the news digest, the language for the news digest, or a combination of two or more of these
  • Personalize a news digest according to user settings, e.g., personal interests of a user
  • Provide a news digest to a user device for a time period during which a user was unable to check the news
  • Provide a news digest to a user device that includes top stories for a historical time period, e.g., ten years ago
  • Provide a news digest to a user device that includes top stories for a particular topic of interest, e.g., when the particular topic of interest does not have frequent news stories

The Automated News Digest patent can be found at:

Automated news digest
Inventors: Pan Gu, Mayuresh Saoji, Yuqiang Guan, Maricia Scott, Vikas Sukla, and Anand Devraj Paka
Assignee: Google LLC
US Patent: 10,242,096
Granted: March 26, 2019
Filed: March 15, 2016

Abstract

Methods, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on computer storage media, for automatic generation of news digests. One of the methods includes accessing a database storing news snapshots, each snapshot identifying a predetermined quantity of top news stories for a period of time, each of the top news stories in a particular snapshot for a particular period of time ranked according to an importance score that measures the importance of the news story relative to other news stories for the particular period of time, determining a digest time period, determining, for the digest time period, all of the snapshots with periods of time included in the digest time period, generating, from the top news stories in the determined snapshots, a digest ranking of digest news stories, and providing, to a user device, data identifying one or more of the digest news stories for presentation according to the digest ranking.

Takeaways

The Google blog post told us a few things that weren’t mentioned in the Automated News Digest Patent.

One is that for articles to appear in a “top stories” carousel, they do not need to be registered as news sites with Google. So timely blog posts and articles aren’t at news sites, but cover one of the news stories for a specific time could be included in the carousels.

The blog post also told us that Google will include in those carousels notable quotes and related opinion pieces. The purpose of those is to make sure that the news being shown is more detailed and diverse.

The importance score approach for particular news stories explains how certain stories are selected as top news, but not how the articles chosen for carousel slots are selected.


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The Importance of Educating Clients in the PPC Marketing Industry

August 20, 2019 No Comments

When a Search Marketing Agency pitches a new client, they may provide them a complimentary audit, initial strategy overview, competitive analysis, etc…

Read More


The Importance of Educating Clients in the PPC Marketing Industry

June 28, 2019 No Comments

When a Search Marketing Agency pitches a new client, they may provide them a complimentary audit, initial strategy overview, competitive analysis, etc… However, once the client signs on the dotted line and the work begins, more often than not, overt time the client slips into the dark with regard to the specifics. These specifics consist of the day-to-day “blocking and tackling” of PPC. (keyword matching, search queries, ctr%, quality score, competitive bidding, affiliate hijacking, etc…). When something goes wrong with an account (and is always does), the PPC Marketer/Agency needs to explain the cause and effect and it is that situation where the client needs to know what they hell they are talking about.

In this post, I will discuss some specific instances where it’s in the best interest of both parties to educate one another in order to not only grow the business, but to keep the relationship from turning sour.

Discuss What Metrics Matter Most

Regardless of how seasoned a client/prospect might be with regard to “PPC metric lingo”, it’s in the best interest of both parties to explain which metrics matter the most and why. Sometimes, Adwords metrics such as interactions, engagement rates, etc… are not exactly accurate on measuring success. Success is should identified by conversions. For example, take this scenario.

  • Increased Impressions: In general, one might think this is a good thing but depending on the targeting and platform, absolutely NOT and here’s why.
    • Search Networks: More impressions can reduce the CTR% which in turn lower Quality Score and hence, result in higher costs and worse AVG Position. This also results in additional “irrelevant” traffic that will drive up budgets and lower the overall Cost/Conversion.
    • Display Networks: Depending on the bidding options, (especially CPM) an increase in impressions will only drive up costs. Need to make sure CPC is set to this option.

The Influence of Competitors:

When a company enters the world of PPC Marketing, they will encounter competitors not only bidding on similar keywords, but also their “sacred” brand terms and this can have a detrimental effect on the overall performance of the account. It’s important to keep a watchful eye on this and develop strategies to counteract this problem. Here are some strategies to protect the brand:

  • Make sure the client files their trademark with Google to ensure no one else can use their trademarked term in text Ads.
  • Send an email/letter to all Affiliates and Resellers that they are NOT permitted to bid on the trademarked name in any of their Text/Banner Ads.
  • Contact competitors directly and ask them to stop bidding on their trademark terms. (if they do not oblige, getting legal assistance would be beneficial)

Attribution of other Online or Offline Advertising

Attribution can be a tricky thing to interpret, especially to a client, but it’s imperative to tell a story that makes sense. Understanding attribution varies depending on the life cycle of the client (history, offline advertising, social media presence, etc..). Typically, a new advertiser will have to rely on “non-brand” terms to drive the most relevant traffic to their product or service. Once history as been accumulated and more people get familiar with the brand, consumers will ultimately type in their brand name (Search Engine, Direct/Bookmark) to get to their site.

The client needs to understand that it will take time to grow their brand and that this is a revolving cycles. For example, “non-branded” terms are more costly and do not provide many conversions so we automatically want to pause the campaign. Bad Idea! Quite often, the “non-brand” terms are the first point of contact that introduce the brand. Yes, it costs more money, does not result in an immediate conversion, but over time it’s what generated the customer.

Importance of “After-the-Click”

Perfecting the fundamentals of Quality Score in a campaign is a good thing. Buuuut….. it’s only half the battle. The other half is persuading the customer to take an action and frankly that is the only thing that matters here. Even though the term “after-the-click” is simple in its meaning, execution is another story. It is this strategic obstacle that can be achieved, but requires constant and intelligent testing to ensure maximum effectiveness. Bottom line: The client needs to understand that in order to maximize their Ad dollars, they will need to the invest time and money into these strategies. The following Tactics would include:

  • A/B Landing Page Testing
  • Cart/Form Testing
  • Audience Testing
  • Promotion/Offer Testing

The Trust Factor:

It’s very easy for customers to trust the platform that they are advertising on. There is this “fuzzy / comfortable” feeling that if Google recommends it, then it must be a good strategy. However, I would strongly recommend that any of the Google’s Opportunities  (even though sometimes justified) need to be viewed as a just a suggestion, not an immediate decision. Remember, Google is a lucrative business because they want advertisers to spend more money with them. Increasing traffic and spend may sound good on paper, but they do not come with any guarantees in terms of conversions. When appropriate, clients need to understand the difference.

In Conclusion:

There is a “fine-line” that needs to be met where Agencies need to maintain control the PPC Accounts, while allowing the client to continue to interact and take part in the overall strategy. One way to overcome any potential issues is to educate them on all of the intricacies that may occur throughout the client-agency relationship. Once the client has developed a good rapport with the agency, it becomes easier to properly manage their performance expectations.


PPC Marketing Consultant | Google Ads Agency


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