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How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for Better Conversions

August 16, 2022 No Comments

If you’re running a coworking business, you know that your contact page is key to your website. After all, it’s the page where potential customers can get in touch with you to learn more about your space and perhaps even book a tour. In this sense, every lead that reaches your contact page is important, and if you can convert more leads into members, your business will thrive in no time.

If you want to improve your conversion rate, it’s vital to ensure that your contact page is adequately optimized. So today, I’m going to share some tips on how to do just that. Keep reading for more!

What is a Contact Page, and Why is it Important for Coworking Businesses?

A contact page on a website provides visitors with information about how to get in touch with the business or organization. In most cases, the contact page is where leads go when they want to get in touch with you directly, usually after they’ve perused the rest of your website, meaning they’re already interested in what you offer.

Contact pages are important for any business since they help visitors feel there’s someone real running the business, someone they can reach out to and communicate with directly if they need to. While this is particularly important in industries prone to scams that rely on trust, like investment firms and trading platforms, it’s also important to coworking businesses.

For coworking businesses, the contact page is essential because it’s often the first real point of contact between the company and a lead, making it a clear opportunity to convert them into paying customers. A lead will go to a coworking space’s contact page because they want to find out more about the space, ask questions about the service, or even schedule a tour. On the other hand, they may just be interested in pinpointing the space’s exact location to see if it works for them, or they may simply want to get in touch with a real person for a more natural “human” interaction.

What Does “Conversion” Mean for Your Coworking Business’s Contact Page

In marketing, a conversion is nothing more than a goal that a website or a business wants a visitor to complete. In other words, it’s the ideal or desired outcome you want whenever someone visits a website, watches an ad, or reads a blog post. In PPC marketing, for example, typical definitions of conversion would be an action like clicking on an ad, signing up for a newsletter, filling out an email capture form, or making a purchase.

In a well-thought-out marketing plan, every ad, every web page, every CTA, and every asset we use has a specific role to play in driving the lead down the sales funnel or driving the visitor to the desired action. For coworking businesses’ contact page, although we could think that the ideal conversion would be to get the lead to book an office or sign up for a membership, that’s not always the case.

First, contact pages aren’t exclusively targeted to leads. They can also be targeted to media outlets or potential business partners. However, even in the case of leads, one of the most common conversion goals is getting visitors to schedule a tour of the space. There’s a simple reason for this. An in-person tour is the best way to show potential customers what your space offers in terms of amenities and the overall vibe. It’s also an opportunity for you to build rapport with the lead and establish trust. In other words, tours are what you should optimize for subscriptions and actual sales; your contact page is what you want to optimize to book those tours.

Information to Include in a Contact Page

There are three main groups of people who will go to a company’s contact page:

  • Potential leads who are already thinking about becoming paying customers.
  • Media outlets and reporters who want to get in touch for an interview or story.
  • Other businesses that want to partner up or collaborate.

Each of these groups has different needs, and it’s crucial that your contact page can accommodate all of them.

Information for Leads

For potential leads, you’ll want to ensure that your contact information is easy to find and that there are multiple ways for them to get in touch with you (e.g., phone, email, live chat, contact form). You’ll also want to include basic information about your business, such as your address, business hours, and a map with your precise location.

The goal is to make it as easy as possible for leads to get in touch with you and find the information they need. Remember, if they’re on your contact page, they’re interested in your business and are trying to take the next step. Don’t make it harder for them by hiding your contact information or making it hard to find.

Information for Reporters and Media Outlets

If you want to be featured in the press, you also need to make it easy for reporters to find your contact information and pitch you their story idea. You should have separate contact channels for the press, including a press email address and a link to your Press Kit (if you have one).

Information for Business Partners

If you’re open to partnerships with other businesses or perhaps are seeking someone to invest in your coworking space, your contact page should have a dedicated section for partner inquiries. Again, ensure the information is easy to find and that there are multiple ways for partners to get in touch (e.g., phone, email, contact form). It’s also important to show your current partners and other businesses you’ve partnered with in the past.

Linking to Your Contact Page From PPC Ads

Optimizing your contact page for conversions is useless if people can’t find your contact page. That’s why it’s vital to add easy-to-find links across your site. However, even with those links, it’s possible that your contact page may not get the traffic you would like. That’s where PPC comes to the rescue.

Adding a link to your contact page in a PPC ad is a great way to increase traffic to your contact page and, as a result, increase conversions. This can serve as a secondary goal of a PPC ad campaign (e.g., “Book a tour” or “Get in touch”).

When adding a link to your contact page in a PPC ad, there are two things you need to keep in mind:

  • The link should be visible and easy to find.
  • The CTA should be clear and match the ad’s messaging.

9 Tips on How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for More Conversions

Now that we know what contact pages are, why they’re important for coworking businesses, what minimum information they should include, and how to drive traffic to them, let’s focus on how to get visitors to convert.

In this section, I’ll give you tips on optimizing a contact page for conversions, focusing on converting potential leads to help your coworking business grow. I’ll cover optimizing for reporters or potential business partners in a future post.

Tip #1: Make It Easy to Find Your Full Business Address and Contact Information

A coworking space is necessarily a brick-and-mortar business that members will visit in person, so there’s no point in doing anything other than being completely transparent about your business address. If you offer multiple coworking spaces, make sure visitors can easily find each space’s exact address. In these cases, it would be very beneficial to add a tool that allows them to type in an address they’re interested in and have the tool show the spaces nearest that particular address.

The same goes for your contact information. Include as many ways to get in touch as possible (e.g., phone, email, online chat, social media), and ensure that this information is also easy to find.

Tip #2: Make it Extremely Easy to Book a Tour or Make a Reservation

User experience is an important part of conversion optimization, and when processes are easier and require fewer steps, people are more likely to go through with them.

When it comes to booking a tour or making a reservation, you want to make the process as easy as possible. Ideally, booking a tour shouldn’t take more than two or three steps to complete.

 Tip #3: Minimize the Number of Fields in Your Contact Form

As an extension of the previous tip, when crafting your general contact form or the form to book a tour, you should make it as short and with as few fields as possible. Studies show that forms with fewer fields have much higher conversion rates than those that require more information. The more fields there are, the greater the chance someone will abandon the form altogether. At a minimum, you should only require an email address and name. If you need additional information, consider making some of the fields optional so visitors can just skip over them if they want. If you do, make sure to make it extra clear that they’re optional, so they’re not scared off by the prospect of having to fill in a bunch of information.

Tip #4: Avoid Captchas if Possible

Let’s get something clear right off the bat: website managers love captchas; users don’t! Nothing disrupts user experience like waiting for a captcha to load, solving it (sometimes several of them in a row), and waiting for it to confirm you’re not a bot. No one wants spam, but captchas aren’t as effective as you would think at avoiding it.

Captchas are supposed to be easy for humans and hard for bots. However, studies show that they’re becoming exceedingly challenging for humans, while AIs are improving at solving them. Today, captchas seem to be doing the opposite of what they’re supposed to, making things harder for humans and easier for bots. Therefore, adding a captcha to your contact submission process is simply not worth it. It’ll only make you lose valuable leads.

Tip #5: Show Off Your Team

Add photos of your team members to put a face behind the name and build trust with potential members. Is there someone in particular that handles customer inquiries in your company? Then, show that person’s name and face, so visitors know who they’re writing to when submitting a form. Adding this simple human touch can make a big difference in conversions.

Tip #6: Add Social Proof

It goes without saying how effective social proof is for marketing and conversion optimization. If you can show that your coworking space is popular and in demand, people will be more likely to want to join.

There are several ways to do this, but one of the most effective is adding testimonials from current or past members. These could be in the form of written testimonials, videos, and more. If you have many testimonials to choose from, add only those that tell how booking a tour was the best decision to make or how, after the tour, they were sure that that was the coworking space for them.

Tip #7: Optimize Your Contact Page and Contact Form for Mobile

We all know that younger generations are increasingly using their smartphones as their primary (and sometimes only) means of accessing the internet. This trend is especially true when making reservations and bookings online.

Therefore, if you want to optimize your contact page for conversion, you must make sure that both the page and the form are mobile-friendly. This means they should be responsive (adapt to any screen size) and easy to use on a small screen.

Tip #8: Add a FAQ Section

An FAQ section is always a great idea, regardless of what kind of website you’re running. An FAQ can be especially useful for a coworking space contact page because there are many common concerns and questions potential members usually have about these types of spaces. This solution lets you preemptively answer any objections they might have, increasing the likelihood that they’ll book a tour.

Tip #9: Throw in a Chatbot to Answer Questions That Aren’t in the FAQ

FAQs are great, but they can only answer so many questions. If you want to take things one step further, consider adding a chatbot to your contact page.

This way, you can offer potential members more help and support, increasing the chances that they’ll convert into actual paying customers. You can also ask visitors to share their contact information to get in touch with them directly and solve their concerns, but remember about their right to digital privacy and never disclose these details to other partners.

Tip #10: A/B Test Different Versions of Your Contact Page

Finally, no matter how well things should work in theory, many factors influence a visitor’s decision-making process besides the ones covered in these tips. A/B testing different versions of your contact page will give you the insight you need to know what works for your audience and what doesn’t. Try different headlines, copy, images, forms, CTAs, and so on, and see which version performs the best. Then, once you have a winner, implement that version on your live site.

The Bottom Line

These are just a few tips to help you optimize your coworking contact page for better conversion. By following these tips and driving traffic to your contact page through PPC ads or other means, you can be sure that your contact page will work as efficiently as possible to get more leads and conversions for your business.

The post How to Optimize Your Coworking Contact Page for Better Conversions first appeared on PPC Hero.

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How to Optimize Your Facebook Ad Copy

July 26, 2022 No Comments

This blog provides real-life examples and insights from one of our clients in the luxury fashion industry.

How can you cut through the noise on a saturated platform?

Aside from an increase in competition, ads are, in general, becoming more advanced and innovative, capitalizing on the rapid developments in AR, Chatbots, and Immersive Experiences. However, not everybody has the budget to invest in groundbreaking innovation.

If you fall into that category, you can still make considerable improvements by focusing on the fundamentals, like the length of your ad copy.

The Theory

A recent blog post I penned for Brainlabs provides actionable insights for ad copy testing. One of the principles we explored in the blog was ‘cognitive fluency’. In a nutshell, it is the idea that the shorter and simpler a message is, the more likely it is to yield action from your customer. So, we thought we’d test it.

The Test

From January to March 2022, we ran a series of tests between short and long ad copy for a luxury fashion retailer. The first campaign advertised beauty products, while the second’s messaging centered around Valentine’s Day gifts.

Each campaign had two copy variations where the sentiment was kept the same, meaning the only difference between them was the length, where the shorter ad copy fitted into one line, while the longer variation fitted into three. 

The experiment was set up as a side-by-side, observational test. This means that the ads were placed into the same ad set, allowing Facebook to optimize the budget between the ads based on their relative performance.

Beauty & Valentine’s Day Products Campaign Results

As can be seen in the graphs below, the Beauty prospecting audience didn’t show a significant preference between ad copy length, but the retargeting audience exhibited an inclination towards the shorter copy, with 64% of clicks being driven by it.

Similar to the Beauty campaign, ad copy length didn’t make a difference for the Valentine’s Day Prospecting audience, with the shorter variation driving 51.6% of the traffic. However, for the retargeting audience, the shorter copy drove 63.9%, signaling customers’ proclivity toward the shorter version.

When looking at other metrics, we see that the CTR, CPC, and CPM were all very similar across the variations. So, what explains the difference in traffic?

This is a prime example of the Breakdown Effect. To put it simply, the Facebook algorithm aims to achieve the best overall results by delivering different ad variations to different portions of the targeted audience. In this case, The Breakdown Effect suggests that, in the case of the retargeting audience, considerably more users resonated better with the short version.

Summary

The test highlighted an interesting link between ad copy length and consumer intent level. Specifically, for this client, when a consumer has higher purchase intent, a shorter, snappier copy length will perform better.

Contrary to the principle of cognitive fluency, the short ad copy variations didn’t perform better in every instance, rather, the results were more nuanced. As expected, the short version performed better, however, the extent of its impact depended on the intent level of the audience. 

Based on these experiments, the Cognitive Fluency-Intention Hypothesis emerged, proposing that short messages perform better when the audience has greater purchase intent or has pre-existing brand awareness.

It is often the little things that can level up performance and capture valuable insights. So, in your next campaign, try testing something simple such as the length of the ad copy or tailored ad copy – the results might surprise you.

The post How to Optimize Your Facebook Ad Copy first appeared on PPC Hero.

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Using videos to optimize engagement in search-driven buyer journeys

July 16, 2022 No Comments

Using videos to optimize engagement in search-driven buyer journeys

30-second summary:

  • Videos engage and convert, and they also rank incredibly well in organic search, making them the perfect medium for converting searchers into buyers
  • Videos can help guide customers to your brand at stage of the buyer journey
  • Here’s how to create video content that caters to each stage specifically

The process of acquiring a customer begins with your first contact. There are several stages a consumer goes through before becoming a customer and then a loyal customer. A buyer journey starts with identifying or expressing a need. This need then has to be fulfilled in some way or the other. 

With over eight billion searches per year, real buyer journeys are complicated and may take weeks or months. However, to simplify things, here is a snapshot of the key stages a person goes through to become your customer. Since nearly 68 percent of online experiences begin with a search engine all these stages can very well happen in Google itself:

  • Awareness: when a consumer finds out that you have a solution to a problem, they wish to be solved. In many (but not all) cases, this searching journey starts with a “how to” query. 
  • Consideration: when a consumer adds you to the list of prospective solution providers
  • Decision: when a consumer believes you have the best solution and becomes a paying customer.

Businesses need to help consumers make the right decision by providing information, assistance and instilling trust in your brand through the process.

With video content showing up all over search results, it makes sense to use videos for all these three stages in the consumer’s journey. The best thing about videos is that they rank incredibly well, especially if you host them on YouTube and practice video optimization.

The two distinct sections where video can assist your potential customers at each stage of a buying journey are:

  • Featured snippets: When Google includes a video in a featured snippet, that’s a strong signal that people are searching for a video tutorial to solve their problem. If that’s your target search query, creating a video is a must, especially when optimizing for the “awareness” stage in the funnel.
  • Video carousels: Google includes video carousels when a video intent is implied. It is not at all difficult to rank your video there, especially when it comes to specific (low-search-volume) queries, like brand-driven queries.

Here’s an example of both of these sections ranking on the very top of the search result page, pushing organic results way below the above-the-fold part of the screen. Notice a very-well branded video by Lowes being featured for a very relevant – albeit longtail – query. I bet this generates quite a few leads for them. There’s also another brand – The Home Depot – ranking its video in the carousel below. Looks like, both of these brands are doing their homework well:

The Home Depot - Using videos to optimize engagement in search-driven buyer journeys

There are many different kinds of video content that can be used at each specific stage.  These videos help to encourage the consumer to continue their journey with you rather than with your competitor.

Awareness

As the name suggests, this video optimization strategy ensures that your target customers become aware of your brand.

The types of video marketing content that work best at this stage of the funnel include:

Make sure your videos are well-branded to build recognizability: Use your logo and color palette on your video thumbnail, as it is going to show up in search results.

Once the awareness has been created, it is time to consolidate all that effort and transition your consumer to the next stage of consideration.

Consideration

You can enhance your customer experience at this stage through videos that position your product in a way you want it to be positioned. A good reason to use videos at this stage is that they put your product in a real-life context, that is, they show exactly how other people are using your product.

The most effective videos for this stage are:

  • Explainer videos to introduce your consumer to the product and describe what you offer in detail. The explainer videos present the problem, discuss how your company can prove the solution and highlight the features of the product and its benefits to the consumer. Think of these videos as lead magnets: You want them to provide value, not just talk about your product. 
  • Product demo videos to explain how a product or service works in detail. They highlight all the advantages of using the product in an easy to understand format. They often use step by step instructions to show how to use the product and may include some innovative ideas about where to use it. A good script and excellent presentation make it a standout product demo videos of all time. It is a good idea to create an on-site video gallery on your site to share these demos with your site visitors. Videos do slow down your pages, so mind your page load time when using embedded content.
  • Storytelling videos to show a lighter side of your business, humanize it to make it connect with the consumer. These videos tell a story about your business, its hopes, aspirations, and values. Usually, company employees and executives speak about the company, their experiences with it and their work. They are designed to create an emotive response that will strengthen the consumers’ relationship with your company.

As all of these videos are supposed to be ranking in Google, make sure to match them to the actual search queries that have higher commercial intent.

Decision

The third stage of the consumer’s journey is convincing the interested consumer that your product or service offers the best solution to their problem. 

This is the stage where the consumer is already committed to buy and needs a gentle nudge in the right direction. This is the time when you need to emphasize on trust-building so the consumer trusts your brand and buys your product. The most effective videos at this stage are peer testimonials and reviews.

  • Video testimonials: These are the best types of videos for trust and confidence-building in your potential customers and a must for the final stage of customer acquisition which is lead conversion. 
  • Customer-driven storytelling videos showing how your customers use the product in a more creative context.

Your target search queries for these types of videos include:

  • Your product and your brand name: If you have an established brand (or if you are working towards that), your brand name is being searched in Google, and these videos will ensure you’ll have yet another asset you control in brand-driven SERPs. If you are doing a good job tracking your brand in organic search, you already know your important brand-driven search queries.
  • Competitor-driven search queries: These are search queries exploring your competitors’ alternatives and comparing two competitors.

These videos should also be reused in two important ways:

  • Embed them on your key landing pages: Video content is a well-known way to boost conversions but in this case it is a good way to help your customers feel at home as they will see the same video on the page after clicking the link on YouTube. It is also a good idea to curate these videos on your dedicated customer reviews page.
  • Use these videos for your remarketing campaigns. You can use retargeting on YouTube to serve them to people who already went through stage #2 in the buying journey but haven’t converted yet.

Conclusion

Using videos in your organic search strategy to engage customers at each major stage of their buying journey is one of the best examples of how SEO and sales can help each other. Include videos in both SEO and CRO strategies and you will likely see much better results on both fronts.


Ann Smarty is the Founder of Viral Content Bee, Brand and Community manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas. She can be found on Twitter @seosmarty.

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The post Using videos to optimize engagement in search-driven buyer journeys appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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How To Optimize Your, Google My Business Profile

April 18, 2022 No Comments

Want to make the most of your Google My Business profile? Here’s how to optimize it for better search engine visibility. The post How To Optimize Your, Google My Business Profile first appeared on PPC Hero.

Read more at PPCHero.com
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UX Tricks to Optimize Your Landing Page Conversion Rates

April 5, 2022 No Comments

Are you looking for ways to improve your website landing pages while offering a better user experience? PPC Hero has a few tips you’ll want to know about.

Read more at PPCHero.com
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Six data-driven SEO strategies that optimize conversion rates

February 22, 2022 No Comments

Six data-driven SEO strategies that optimize conversion rates

30-second summary:

  • Since Google now focuses heavily on user experience, using data as a pillar to uncover consumer insights will drive your digital marketing success
  • However, marketing teams still need to understand these sources and their areas of impact on the consumer’s experience
  • Atul Jindal helps you cover the ground with his advice and case studies

Studies have shown that businesses using data-driven strategies experience five to eight times higher ROI. Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a process that largely depends on data. The core focus for most CRO strategies is to use consumer data to make their customer journey smoother and experience better.

With search engines also increasing emphasis on user experience, we find a point where SEO strategies start to complement CRO strategies.

But your SEO tactics can truly augment your CRO efforts when driven by data.

In this article, I share six data-driven SEO strategies to supplement your CRO efforts.

From content audit to website personalization, read till the end to find out how you can boost your search engine rankings and conversions altogether!

Data-driven SEO strategies to supplement CRO

Data-driven strategies are online marketing tactics fueled by consumer data. Unlike traditional marketing strategies, data-driven strategies are based on data-backed hypotheses rather than assumptions.

This reliance on solid data makes such strategies the star of the modern marketing world.

Here are six data-driven SEO strategies to make your CRO efforts more promising:

1. Website analysis and optimization

Website analysis is a process through which you test various elements of your website. It analyzes the overall performance of your website and highlights areas of improvement.

The elements that web analysis takes into account include the website’s on-page optimization and technical SEO, finding out about the keywords it ranks for, and what rank it has for different keywords.

Using various web analytics tools, this process also uncovers sources where your website gets traffic from, highlights the flaws in your website’s usability and UX, and provides the basis for the website’s load speed optimization.

Through all of these elements, it helps in enhancing your website’s overall user experience and contributes towards conversion rate optimization.

Additionally, it also provides your web traffic’s demographic and interest data, enabling you to optimize the website for a more relevant user experience.

Google Analytics is the most comprehensive and reliable tool to support your website analysis and optimization efforts. It integrates with your website and tracks all the data you need to optimize your website for an enhanced user experience.

A leading marketing automation software company experienced 10x higher conversion rates when they integrated their native real-time personalization tool with Google Analytics to use the personalization data. This was paired with the Google Analytics information to serve personalized remarketing ads through Google AdWords.

Not only did they experience higher conversion rates, but with the effective use of web analytics data, like demographic and behavior information, they also experienced a 107 percent YoY increase in qualified leads.

2. Content analysis and optimization

Content analysis is similar to website analysis, but instead of testing your website’s technical elements, it analyzes your website’s content and overall content strategy to uncover areas of improvement.

Conversion rates are almost six times higher for businesses that invest in content marketing. But results like this manifest only when your website brims with optimized content.

The purpose of your content is to compel users to take the desired action, or in other words, convert.

Content analysis finds out how well it serves this purpose.

You can uncover various metrics with content analysis, like which content type is the most popular among your audience, which content is bringing you closer to your marketing objectives, and which needs more work.

For example, a marketing optimization software company may have blogs and case studies in its content strategy. Their web analytics may reveal that case studies drive more conversions while blogs get the most social shares.

With its content marketing objective being increased conversions, content analysis will help them focus more on publishing more case studies.

An effective content analysis will also uncover whether or not your content matches the search intent of your target search queries. And therefore, whether or not you need to find new SEO keywords and re-optimize. If your content doesn’t match the search intent perfectly, even if it gets traffic, those users will not convert.

So, in essence, content analysis will help increase conversions by helping you create content that is proven to drive results. It will also help save time and resources from being spent on less-profitable strategies.

Here’s a case study discussing how changing content on your website can reflect a spike in revenue.

Brookdaleliving.com, a website offering community living solutions for the elderly, had a disappointing website conversion rate. But then, their website had nothing that would drive conversions.

The digital marketing experts they hired revamped their website and tested two different content types on their landing page – an image and a testimonial video – to see which one performs better.

Ironically, the web page with an image drove 3.92 percent higher conversions than the original page. This may seem like a small increment, but it resulted in additional revenue of $ 106,000.

3. Website design optimization

Tests like usability testing and A/B testing provide the data that drives website design optimization to improve a website’s design and enhance its user experience.

The purpose of CRO is to make the user journey smoother and experience better.

Website design optimization supports CRO by removing frictions in the buyer’s journey and making it easier for them to accomplish their goals.

But there are a couple of best practices the website design must adhere to to ensure that it really contributes to your CRO efforts.

  1. The design should be simple and somewhat similar to what the users are accustomed to
  2. The navigation bar should be designed intuitively, with the user’s search intent in mind, so they can quickly find what they came looking for
  3. The content arrangement should follow proven design techniques that enhance content readability and value delivery

For your web design to truly serve your business, you will have to continue to test various combinations of website elements, their placements, and designs.

Regardless of how you go about your web design, making the target audience’s journey easier should be at the heart of all your efforts.

Trucker Reports, a trucker’s community that helps truck drivers find jobs, struggled with low conversions.

The CRO experts they hired performed a web design audit and discovered multiple opportunities. Based on these opportunities, they tested different hypotheses.

They tested three different designs against the original ones in their final test and found out that the final design had 79.3 percent higher conversions.

Do you know why?

Because this last design had the least friction and made it easier for the users to convert.

4. Audience analysis

Audience analysis, commonly known as audience research, is the process through which you dig up information about your prospects so you can develop targeted marketing campaigns.

Since user experience is a massive part of SEO and CRO alike, audience analysis holds an important place as a data-driven SEO strategy for conversion rate optimization.

This process uncovers a wide variety of data, from core demographic information like age, gender, marital status, income, education, etc., to online behavior, internal and external challenges, and more.

Audience analysis helps develop a buyer persona, which then becomes the foundation of a highly-targeted marketing campaign.

Audience analysis is a core element of a successful CRO campaign because it makes your website relevant to the users. You find out about their pain points and struggles and are better equipped to address them through your content.

This shows that you care about your customers and inevitably builds trust between your brand and its prospects. Given that the modern customer prioritizes their connection with the brand when making purchase decisions, this bond of trust and reliability results in higher conversions.

Data-backed audience analysis also allows you to segment your audience based on their demographic information and interest. With this level of segmentation, you spend your efforts and resources on people you know matter to your business.

This is why studies indicate a 56 percent reduction in marketing costs for businesses that use audience analysis as a basis for all their marketing efforts.

5. Testing and optimization

Testing is the life of conversion rate optimization. You put samples of your content and design arrangements to test to see which one performs better and optimize using the results of these tests.

These tests are all data-driven, that is, they are based on hypotheses generated from existing data and provide insights into how valid the hypothesis is.

For example, data may show a higher conversion rate on websites with explainer videos. This forms the hypothesis of your test. So, you develop two different landing pages, one with a video and another with an image, to see which performs better. If the videos result in higher conversions, you know what to continue optimizing with!

You can perform different kinds of tests when optimizing websites for conversions. Two of the popular ones include usability testing and A/B or split testing.

Search engines also recommend A/B and multivariate testing for SEO as it improves user experience, which search engines pursue in the websites they index.  

NatureAir performed A/B testing on their landing page to increase conversions. One of the samples had a CTA on the side, while the other had a CTA prominently placed in the content area.

Once the test results were in, they found that placing CTA in the content area increases conversions by 591 percent!

That’s how potent A/B tests can be!

6. Website personalization

According to Google, 90 percent of marketers believe personalization results in business profitability. And why shouldn’t it? In an era with so many similar websites, a web page that offers a customized experience deserves to make better revenue.

Website personalization is a relatively complex process through which you can serve a unique experience to each visitor. These experiences are designed based on consumer data, including their demographic data, interests, search history, and online behavior.

75 percent of consumers prefer that online sellers use personal information to enhance shopping experiences.

People want you to make shopping easier for them, adding a personalized product recommendation on your website will help improve your user experience and could boost sales. They don’t want to go out and search for what they want. They want you to know what they need and bring it to them. And that’s what website personalization empowers you to do.

It improves overall website experience, lowers bounce rates, boosts SEO, and of course, increases conversions.

Serving dynamic content makes the customer’s experience more intuitive and relevant. It lets you put out the content that interests them the most, and hence, contributes to better revenue.

Conclusion

The goal of an SEO and a CRO campaign have become somewhat similar ever since search engines have started giving value to user experience.

There are many SEO strategies focused on improving UX. And these strategies, when backed by data, can lead to increased conversion rates.

Therefore, I have discussed some of the most promising data-driven SEO strategies that can drive conversions in this article.

But the true results of a strategy depend on how well you implement it. So, ramp up your data analysis game, derive insights, implement them, and optimize your strategies for better results.


Atul Jindal is a web design and marketing specialist, having interests in doing websites/apps optimized for SEO with a core focus on conversion optimization. He creates web experiences that bring conversations and transform web traffic into paying customers or leads.

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The post Six data-driven SEO strategies that optimize conversion rates appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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Deliver consistent site experiences with Google Optimize

January 12, 2022 No Comments

Consumers expect connected shopping experiences from research to purchase. But their journeys aren’t linear; they move around, visiting—and revisiting—multiple sites and apps, multiple times a day. 

This makes it challenging for businesses to deliver a coordinated site experience, especially if they are running an experiment or personalization on their site. How do they make sure that the version of their site someone saw in the morning is the same version they see in the afternoon? 

Google Optimize can now understand when a customer has returned to a site they visited before and deliver a consistent site experience. Let’s see how this works.

Imagine you’re a hotel business running a marketing campaign that promotes a 20 percent discount for the upcoming holiday season. When people visit your site in response to the campaign, you want to make sure you offer this discount to them throughout their entire booking experience, even if they come back multiple times before they make a reservation.

One part of your marketing campaign is paid media you buy through Google Ads. In this case, you would use Optimize to create a custom web page featuring the discount and then add the Google Ads rule to ensure this page is shown to people who first arrive to your site from your Google Ads campaign. There are likely many people who click on an ad, explore your site, then come back later to complete the reservation. Now, no matter how many other pages on your site people visit, or how many times they return over 24 hours, Optimize will automatically display that custom page to them each time. 

Another way you promote this sale is through email. For this part of your campaign, once you create a custom web page with the discount offer, add a utm_campaign parameter named “holiday-sale” to the URL in the email. Then in Optimize, add a UTM parameter rule for “holiday-sale.” Optimize can now use that parameter to display the correct experience every time people who received the promo email visit your site. In addition to email, you can also use the UTM parameter rule in advertising campaigns managed with Display & Video 360 and Search Ads 360, or any other campaigns you are running that support UTM parameters.

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Create a UTM parameter rule to focus your experiment or personalization on a particular marketing campaign.

Royal Bank of Canada is an Optimize 360 customer that has already begun using UTM parameter rules. 

Together with their Google Marketing Platform Partner, Bounteous, they often use Optimize 360 to run personalizations across their entire website. Because most of these personalizations are focused on delivering the right content to the right user from their marketing campaigns, they were excited to start using the UTM parameter rule. 

“The customer journey at the Royal Bank of Canada is rarely linear. We need experiments that can react as customers frequently engage and navigate our website. The UTM parameter rule gives us that flexibility, and it is changing the way we approach our campaigns.” 

– Arnab Tagore, Senior Manager of Digital Analytics, Royal Bank of Canada

Both the Google Ads rule and UTM parameter rule are already available to use in Optimize and Optimize 360. We encourage you to go into your account and check them out and we look forward to sharing more new features that help you better meet your customers’ expectations and get the most out of your website.

Google Analytics Blog


A new Optimize feature to keep your website updated through COVID-19

January 4, 2022 No Comments

As communities around the world respond to COVID-19, we know this time presents unique challenges to your business. We’d like to share a few ways Google Optimize can help you keep your website updated with the latest information.

Last week we introduceda new way for you to quickly post an informational banner at the top of your website. This means you can easily let your customers know if your business hours or services have changed – or even just reinforce that you are still open to serve them – and where they can find more information.

And of course you can still use Optimize to help you update any page of your site, so we’ve included some tips and best practices below to get you started.

Quickly add a message on your website

Once you log into your Optimize account you can add a message to the top of your site by clicking “Add a banner.” You can use our templated banner or customize it by editing the color, size, and text. We recommend you use a color that stands out from the other content on the page. You can also select on which pages of your site the banner should be shown, for example only the homepage or on every page of your site.

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Use our template to quickly post a banner at the top of your website with an important message.

You can also tailor your message by location. Let’s say you’re a clothing retailer based in San Francisco and are offering expedited shipping to customers located within the city. Optimize can help you display a customized banner that highlights faster shipping just to users located in San Francisco.

Temporarily update your site

You may have updated store hours or services available at this time. Use Optimize to create a personalization to temporarily display a different version of your site to people when they visit. You can end the personalization whenever you like and your site will go back to displaying its original version.

This is helpful if you want to let your customers know about new ways they can purchase from your business. For example, if you’re a restaurant that is now accepting to-go orders over the phone, you can add your phone number to your home page or make it more visible on your site. Or, if you’re a clothing retailer that is now only accepting online orders, you can update your FAQs page to include your new shipping and return policy.

Consider website best practices

We’ve also put together some additional recommendations to consider while updating your website during this time:

  • Reduce distraction on your site. Avoid automatic product carousels or animation on your site. If you have information about how customers can order from you on the same page, the carousel or animation could draw attention away from that message.

  • Adjust your FAQs page. Your frequently asked questions might be different than what they were last year. Make sure this page highlights what is currently top of mind for your customers. If you need to reduce your customer support load, place your contact information below all other sections to allow users to read your FAQs first.

  • Change your message for mobile devices. Adding longer messages to your customers may display fine on desktop but they probably will be too long on mobile devices. Limit your messages on your mobile site to less than 50 characters. And allow users to close the message if they wish.

Normally Optimize users would only be able to run 10 personalizations on their site at the same time. We have temporarily removed this restriction for the next 90 days so that you can make as many updates to your site as you need until July 31, 2020. If you don’t already have an Optimize account, you can create one for free here.

Google Analytics Blog


How to optimize keywords and SEO titles with popular keywords

December 22, 2021 No Comments

30-second summary:

  • Title optimization of articles, blogs, or webpages is critical to get traffic and earn money from Adsense and affiliates
  • The standard advice is to stick to one keyword phrase per page to maintain strict relevance and avoid getting penalized for keyword stuffing
  • Adding extra related keywords, however, apart from the modifiers and words to create a sensible title has the potential to get more traffic to websites
  • Here are some good insights and tips on how you can optimize your keywords titles

Optimizing titles of articles, blogs or webpages is critical for getting traffic and earning money from Adsense and affiliates. The standard advice is to stick to one keyword phrase per page to maintain strict relevance and avoid getting penalized for keyword stuffing. But adding extra, related keywords, apart from the modifiers and words to create a sensible title, has the potential to get more traffic to your site.

In this article, I’ll review, my own experience in crafting carefully multiple keyword titles.

Keep the title short – one keyword phrase to a page

As a golden tip, start targeting individual keywords on separate pages and use multiple pages for related words. General landing pages for mixed or general topics generally will not work because you will not be able to compete for popular single keywords without adding phrases for longtail titles. The general advice is that you should keep the title short (less than 70 characters) and only target perhaps two or three primary keywords that are highly relevant to the content of the page and its objective. You can of course develop long-tail keywords that include your primary keywords plus a series of modifiers to make a ‘sensible’ title that makes sense to humans and the test the bots use to evaluate your sites.

Avoid keyword stuffing

There is a lot of information on the dangers of keyword stuffing, which means over-use of your keyword or keywords in the title, description, and the body copy. Google invokes a penalty for keyword stuffing, though the threshold keyword density is not exactly known. There are various tools for counting keyword use frequencies. Keyword Density is simply measured as the relative number of times your search term (Keyword or Keyword phrase) occurs as a percentage of the total number of words on a given page. The ideal Keyword Density must not be greater than 5.5 percent. But various search engines have different thresholds before they apply penalties. Reasonably, high Keyword Densities can help boost page rankings but you don’t have to overdo it.

Keyword Density can be boosted by using your keywords repeatedly in the:

  • Title tag
  • Header tag
  • Comment tag
  • Body tag
  • Anchor tag
  • Image tag
  • Alt tag
  • Domain name, and
  • Paragraph tag

Another general piece of advice for titles is not to exceed using the identical keyword in the title more than twice.

How Google and other search engines crawl and rank your keywords in the title

It is not widely understood, but Google and other search engines register and rank every individual keyword in your title and every combination – including various orders and positions for the keywords. Although there is a priority for phrases with the keywords in the order they are in the Title, and for words that appear first, Google will register all the keywords and phrases and derive a ranking for them.

Dilution of the weight of the keywords in the title

Google also appears to regard long titles as more likely to be Spammy (especially very long titles). Longer titles may also appear keyword-stuffed. Research has shown that the first keyword in the title has the highest weight; the second keyword has somewhat less weight and so on. By adding more words you may dilute the weight applied to each of them. For targeting two-word searches and phrases, it is important to keep keywords close to each other and in their ‘natural’ order. Try to match the likely order of the terms in the search phrase, to the order in the title.

Use multiple keyword phrases multiply your traffic

If Google derives a rank for all the words in the title, surely, by including two or three keywords rather than one will be more likely to get more traffic. The traffic for each word should add up and multiply. Understanding when this is appropriate and when it is not is the crux of optimizing titles. As explained previously the weight or value of the keyword appears to fall rapidly as you move from the first word to the last. More keywords appear to dilute the weight given for each word. Also, there is the important issue of relevance. Your page may be penalized if the words you use are not highly relevant to the content of the page.

The key aspect is competition – only use a single phrase if the competition is high

If there is a lot of competition for a keyword then it is best to only use a single keyword or phrase. Stick to the keyword phrase you have found using the Google Keyword Planner for use in the title. You know the statistic and competition for that exact phrase and it is unwise to fiddle with it. Various tools can be used to estimate competition for the phrase and the likely traffic. The Keyword Research tool shows how even minor changes in the phrase can dramatically affect traffic and competition.

If the competition is high you have to maintain the strength of your page and title to compete. Adding extra phrases will dilute the weight applied to the keyword. You will be competing against pages that are likely to be strongly targeted on that keyword phrase as well. You could lose the battle if you don’t have that singular, highly focused title for the keyword.

If there is moderate competition enrich your title with more keywords

For moderate competition, there are several ways you can go to use multiple keywords in the title.

1. Use two or more Modifiers

The solution to not duplicating the keyword is to add one or two extra modifiers or action words. If you look at the competitive keyword phrases shown by the Google Keyword Tool you will often find that two phrases look promising that both contain the primary keyword or phrase.

[action word 1 keyword] + [keyword action word 2] = [action word 1 keyword action word 2]

Let’s say, for instance, you are after a keyword title for your article about Green Tea health benefits and you want to use a longtail keyword narrowing the search to extracts. The obvious solution is:

  • Health Benefits of Green Tea Extracts

This provides a title for four phrases

  • Benefits of Green
  • Health Benefits of Green Tea
  • Green Tea Extracts
  • Health Benefits of Green Tea Extracts

Another example is a title about Professional Make-up Artists

Reviews of Professional Make-up Artists + Make-up Artist Portfolios = Reviews of Professional Make-up Artist Portfolios

This makes the title target four phrases in one:

  • Reviews of Professional Make-up Artists
  • Make-up Artist Portfolios
  • Professional make-up artist portfolios
  • Reviews of Professional Make-up Artist Portfolios

In both cases, this very simple tactic makes it possible to create a short concise title that is enriched by optimizing it for more than one key term and narrowing down your target audience. Perhaps your article is about creating portfolios and how to find and review make-up artists and this title targets these keywords. Of course, it is often hard to find word combinations similar to these and it emphasizes that title design is a real art. These examples also show how the use of action keywords and modifier phrases to target buyers who are ready to buy, which will fulfill the aim of your website.

2. Long tail action based keyword choices

Long-tail titles using action words are generally more effective, as action-based queries usually attract users that have already got their credit card out and are hungry to find what they want and to buy it. Targeting your audience will lose part of the potential audience but the ones you have filtered for will be more likely to buy.

The role of SEO title optimization is to enrich the keywords in the title that potential buyers might use when conducting a search to target the group that is interested in your product or services.

The best strategy is to build the longtail keyword title, not by using poorly selected action words as modifiers, but by researching the action words and phrases as well for maximum benefit.

Combine competitive keyword phrases to enrich the title

The Google Keyword Planner Tool might show two promising keyword phrases essentially related to the same topic. Let say, for instance, that you are trying to market green tea extracts using their health benefits, particularly to help people having issues with losing weight. The Google Keyword Planner Tool shows three competitive phrases

  • green tea health benefits
  • green tea extract
  • green tea health benefits for weight loss

These phrases can be combined in ways that retain the order of the words (with green tea as the first phrase) but allow all these phrases to work in your title.

For example

  • Green Tea Extract: Health Benefits for Weight Loss

This longtail keyword is optimized for all three competitive phrases.

The ideal separator for two phrases

What is the ideal separator when using multiple keyword phrases? It does not really matter. You can use a pipe (|), a colon (:) a dash (-), or a comma (,)

However, don’t use the underscore ( _ ) as search engines don’t recognize it as a separator. These characters have no ranking benefit, but they help make your title readable.

Dealing with plurals and synonyms

In some cases, you may want to expand the keywords in the title to include plurals, synonyms, and other expressions for your topic. For example “architect supply”, “architectural supplies” and “technical drawing equipment” essentially deal with the same topic. You will need to craft the title to include these variants if you can.

For example: “Architectural supplies: Technical Drawing Equipment for Architects”

One of the potential dangers with targeting a single term in your title is that it creates a tendency for over-optimization, even when it’s not intended. You may use that single keyword everywhere on your page. If you include variants this is less likely to happen.

Don’t overdo it!

You need to be careful because adding more keywords can mean that each of them will have less and less impact. The more you try to stuff extra keywords into the less natural it is going to sound. For example, if you use the following title it will appear in the search results as –

Cheap Coffee | Gourmet Coffee | Ground Gourmet Coffee

Google won’t like it as it will be interpreted as keyword stuffing. Your potential customers won’t like it because they will see it as unnatural and likely to provide useless promotional material

Much better would be:

Low Price Ground Gourmet Coffee and Fresh Roasted Bean Suppliers

Which version looks better in the search results? Which one is less likely to be seen as keyword stuffing and deception?

If you have a keyword ‘Recycling Information – How And Where To Recycle

What if you want to optimize an article for the keyword “Recycling Tips” as well?

You could build a title such as

Recycling Information – Recycling Tips – How and Why Recycling is Better

But this is clearly keyword stuffing and Google will probably penalize it.

A better option is

Recycling Information – Tips, Tricks and How to Recycle

You can see that your second keyword recycling tips is in the title, but with the keyword word information in between. This will be slightly less effective but Google will still list you page for the keyword Recycling Information – Tips. If you look at the search results where the matching keywords are shown in ‘bold’, you will notice that this often occurs even for pages that appear high up in the search results.

Final thoughts

  • Building traffic is important, but it is conversion rates that really matter
  • The keyword “tail” should not “wag” your dog (marketing strategy). Keep the focus on the major keyword and keep it at the front of your title.
  • Use association and keyword matching to group keywords. Rank your potential phrases for search popularity, but make sure you can compete for them and cascade down by adding modifiers to build a longtail title that will work.
  • Never forget that a human user will determine your conversion rates, not the search engines
  • Your titles must be readable and appealing

If you do all this along with writing high-quality content intended for people and optimized for Google, your articles, blog, or webpages will suddenly be ranking for multiple keywords with high conversion rates. You may even end up being in the first spot for a keyword that was never your main focus.


Jacob M. is a copywriter, marketing blogger, inbound marketing consultant, and founder of Write Minds. He can be found on Twitter @jmcmillen89.

Subscribe to the Search Engine Watch newsletter for insights on SEO, the search landscape, search marketing, digital marketing, leadership, podcasts, and more.

Join the conversation with us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post How to optimize keywords and SEO titles with popular keywords appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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How To Optimize Your Website For Higher Conversion

June 11, 2021 No Comments

Wanting to know how to improve your conversion rate to make the most out of your online traffic? Here is how to optimize your website for higher conversion.

Read more at PPCHero.com
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